The Pros and Cons of Having a Joint Credit Card

Credit Cards

The Pros and Cons of Having a Joint Credit Card

The Pros and Cons of Having a Joint Credit Card

A joint credit card is one that is wholly owned by two people. That means that both people have an equal level of responsibility when it comes to the card. Either person can make a change to the account or charge something to the card(s). They’re both also obligated to pay off any debts associated with the... Read More

Can a Gym Send You to Collections?

Credit Score

Can a Gym Send You to Collections?

Can a Gym Send You to Collections?

You join a gym to get fit, but membership contracts and unexpected bills can potentially leave your credit score in bad shape. Fitness clubs may send your account to collections if you miss payments, turning misunderstandings into recurring problems and frequent reports to credit bureaus. Even years down the road, old debts from canceled gym... Read More

Equifax Data Breach: Settlement Options

Identity Theft

Equifax Data Breach: Settlement Options

Equifax Data Breach: Settlement Options

In the fall of 2017, Equifax experienced a massive data breach. Approximately 147 million people were victims of this data breach. Recently a federal court has purposed a class action settlement. If you are part of this data breach, you are able to file a claim today. Was I Part of The Equifax Data Breach?... Read More

I Gave My Social Security Number to a Scammer, Now What?

Identity Theft

I Gave My Social Security Number to a Scammer, Now What?

I Gave My Social Security Number to a Scammer, Now What?

Let’s face it: your Social Security number is probably out there somewhere. This federal identification number is used for so many purposes—from tax forms to credit apps to student information forms—that it exists in myriads of places. And while organizations that ask for personally identifying information, including your Social Security number (SSN), do have an obligation to keep... Read More

The Capital One Data Breach: What You Need to Know

Identity Theft

The Capital One Data Breach: What You Need to Know

The Capital One Data Breach: What You Need to Know

A major data breach was recently announced by Capital One. This latest data breach affects 100 million people in the United States. Between March and July 2019, a hacker was able to access to 100 million Capital One customer accounts. Capital One fixed the vulnerability right away and began working with law enforcement. Their investigation... Read More

Are Credit Card to Credit Card Payments Possible?

Credit Cards

Are Credit Card to Credit Card Payments Possible?

Are Credit Card to Credit Card Payments Possible?

Are Credit Card to Credit Card Payments Possible and a Good Idea? Paying the balance on one of your credit cards with another credit card is possible. But when you make a credit card to credit card payment, you’re not reducing debt— you’re simply moving it from one account to another. Whether or not this is a good idea... Read More

What Happens If You Lie on Your FAFSA?

Student Loans

What Happens If You Lie on Your FAFSA?

What Happens If You Lie on Your FAFSA?

Every student getting ready for college is hit with the reality of how expensive higher education can be. It might be tempting to lie on the FAFSA. However, lying on FAFSA can come with serious consequences. You could face criminal charges of fraud, and most of the time, you have to payback any financial aid you received under false pretenses. Find out... Read More

Should You Combine Finances After Marriage?

Personal Finance

Should You Combine Finances After Marriage?

Should You Combine Finances After Marriage?

Combining your finances as a couple — especially after you get married — comes with pros and cons. Whether you decide to keep your money his and hersor make all finances oursdepends on a variety of factors. Your income, debt and credit situations, individual and joint goals and your own habits can all be reasons... Read More

Does Getting Rejected Hurt Your Credit?

Credit 101

Does Getting Rejected Hurt Your Credit?

Does Getting Rejected Hurt Your Credit?

Does Getting Rejected Affect Credit Score? Applying for credit takes at least a bit of work—you may need to gather income documents or fill out a paper or online application. And you probably have some hopes resting on this process, such as getting a new vehicle or a new credit card. So, disappointment is understandable if the... Read More

Should You Give Your Children an Allowance?

Personal Finance

Should You Give Your Children an Allowance?

Should You Give Your Children an Allowance?

Should Parents Give Their Child Allowance? Learning how to manage money is an important skill, and it’s one that is best learned earlier rather than later. Giving your child an allowance is one way to start teaching them about budgeting and saving, but it’s something that should be done with intention. Understanding the rationale behind... Read More

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