Your Visa Card Can Now Earn Points Toward Your Uber Rides

Personal Finance

Your Visa Card Can Now Earn Points Toward Your Uber Rides

Your Visa Card Can Now Earn Points Toward Your Uber Rides

This week the ride-hailing app Uber announced a partnership with Visa that allows users to earn free rides by swiping the Visa card tied to their Uber account. It’s called Local Offers, and here’s how the system works. Customers can simply “enroll” in any of the participating businesses that interest them on Uber’s app. Then, each time they spend a dollar at one... Read More

Why You May Start Seeing More Chip Card Readers Soon

Credit Cards

Why You May Start Seeing More Chip Card Readers Soon

Why You May Start Seeing More Chip Card Readers Soon

The switch to chip-enabled credit cards last year came with a serious deadline: New rules went into effect in October making merchants more liable for fraud. As is obvious to everyone who’s swiped when they should have inserted their card at a checkout line, the changeover hasn’t gone as smoothly as hoped. So, quietly, the credit card associations have... Read More

How Companies Know Your New Credit Card Number Before You Give it to Them

Credit Cards

How Companies Know Your New Credit Card Number Before You Give it to Them

How Companies Know Your New Credit Card Number Before You Give it to Them

Recently, a Netflix customer took to Reddit to explain how he got a big surprise when the streaming service charged him using his new credit card number, which he hadn’t given them. How did that happen? One commenter offered a clue: Netflix likely participates in Visa’s Account Updater program. Netflix declined to comment on whether it uses updater services. However, for... Read More

There’s Officially a Credit Card You Can Use in Cuba

Credit Cards

There’s Officially a Credit Card You Can Use in Cuba

There’s Officially a Credit Card You Can Use in Cuba

The first U.S. credit card for use in Cuba could potentially make travel to the country easier for Americans. As CNBC reports, Pompano Beach-based Stonegate Bank in Florida has created a MasterCard, available today, that “will let U.S. travelers charge purchases at state-run businesses and a handful of private ones, mostly high-end private restaurants equipped with... Read More

Wal-Mart Sues Visa Over Chip Card Transactions

Credit Cards

Wal-Mart Sues Visa Over Chip Card Transactions

Wal-Mart Sues Visa Over Chip Card Transactions

Two industry giants are set to face off in court over that chip debit card in your wallet. Wal-Mart filed a lawsuit against Visa on Tuesday, alleging the network is forcing its customers to use signatures in lieu of PINs when paying with chip-based debit cards, The Wall Street Journal reports.  This compromises customers’ security, Wal-Mart asserts,... Read More

Visa Adds New Tools to Give You More Control of Your Credit Cards

Credit Cards

Visa Adds New Tools to Give You More Control of Your Credit Cards

Visa Adds New Tools to Give You More Control of Your Credit Cards

Credit cards are getting smarter — finally. Last year, Discover launched its nifty “Freeze It” feature, which acts like a temporary on/off switch for account holders who think-they-have-but-maybe-haven’t lost their card. Now, Visa is announcing a whole set of similar app-activated “switches” that give consumers even more granular fraud-fighting and allowance-permitting tools. Called “Visa Consumer... Read More

Visa vs. Mastercard: What’s the Difference?

Credit Cards

Visa vs. Mastercard: What’s the Difference?

Visa vs. Mastercard: What’s the Difference?

The names Visa and MasterCard are paired nearly as frequently as Minneapolis and St. Paul or Dallas and Fort Worth. But while these major cities are close neighbors, Visa and MasterCard are large payment networks that compete against each other. But to cardholders, Visa and MasterCard sometimes appear to be interchangeable. What’s the Difference? To most credit... Read More

Substantial Payout to Retailers Looms for Visa, MasterCard

Credit Cards

Substantial Payout to Retailers Looms for Visa, MasterCard

Substantial Payout to Retailers Looms for Visa, MasterCard

The controversial settlement between a number of retail groups and the world’s two largest processors of debit and credit card payments is set to move forward after receiving preliminary approval, but objections to the deal still linger. U.S. District Court Judge John Gleeson recently said that the antitrust settlement between merchants groups and both Visa... Read More

Verizon’s $2 Fee: Can They Do That?

Credit Cards

Verizon’s $2 Fee: Can They Do That?

Verizon’s $2 Fee: Can They Do That?

When I heard today about Verizon’s announcement that it will charge a $2 convenience fee for debit and credit card payments made online or by phone, my first reaction was one of outrage. I am a Verizon customer who pays online with plastic, and I don’t want to pay an extra $24 a year for... Read More

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