Report: 600,000 Veterans Could Go Without Health Insurance Next Year

Uncategorized

Report: 600,000 Veterans Could Go Without Health Insurance Next Year

Report: 600,000 Veterans Could Go Without Health Insurance Next Year

A new Urban Institute report predicts that more than 600,000 veterans will go without health insurance in 2017 unless there are policy changes to the Medicaid program. They point out that more than half of those veterans live in the 19 states that have not expanded Medicaid. “If Medicaid expansion decisions do not change between now... Read More

The Average 65-Year-Old Retired Couple Needs $260,000 to Cover Health Care

Managing Debt

The Average 65-Year-Old Retired Couple Needs $260,000 to Cover Health Care

The Average 65-Year-Old Retired Couple Needs $260,000 to Cover Health Care

Paying for health care is hard on many Americans, but costs are especially high in retirement. That’s according to recent analysis by Fidelity Investments, released this week, which found a 65-year-old couple retiring this year will need about $260,000 to cover their health care. “The estimate applies to retirees with traditional Medicare insurance coverage,” Fidelity said in a press... Read More

There Have Been Double-Digit Increases in Medical Costs in Just a Year

Managing Debt

There Have Been Double-Digit Increases in Medical Costs in Just a Year

There Have Been Double-Digit Increases in Medical Costs in Just a Year

Anyone who’s reviewed their health insurance statements is well-acquainted with just how high medical bills can climb. Now, a new analysis from TransUnion found that consumers are increasingly being asked to shoulder the costs. Per the credit bureau, patients saw a 13% rise in both deductible and out-of-pocket maximum costs between 2014 and 2015. The average deductible for consumers in 2015 was... Read More

The Proposal That Could Keep Medical Debt From Trashing Your Credit Score

Credit Score

The Proposal That Could Keep Medical Debt From Trashing Your Credit Score

The Proposal That Could Keep Medical Debt From Trashing Your Credit Score

The 43 million Americans estimated to have medical debt on their credit reports could find some credit score relief should a new Senate bill come to pass. Five senators —Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.),  Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Bob Menendez (D-N.J.), and Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) — introduced legislation late last week that would remove paid-off and... Read More

How to Deal With a Medical Debt Collector

Managing Debt

How to Deal With a Medical Debt Collector

How to Deal With a Medical Debt Collector

For many Americans, medical debt is a very serious matter. Studies between 2005 and 2013 showed that medical debts are the single largest contributor to personal bankruptcy filings in the U.S. According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, half of all overdue debt on credit reports is from medical debt; one in five credit reports contains... Read More

Think the Insured Can Afford Their Medical Bills? Not So, New Survey Finds

Managing Debt

Think the Insured Can Afford Their Medical Bills? Not So, New Survey Finds

Think the Insured Can Afford Their Medical Bills? Not So, New Survey Finds

Despite the recent federal law requiring that most Americans buy health insurance or pay a fine, this mandated insurance coverage still fails to protect a significant percentage of Americans. A new Kaiser Family Foundation/New York Times survey challenges a narrative put forth by many policymakers — the notion that patients do not have enough “skin... Read More

5 Things You Must Think About Before Choosing Your 2016 Employee Benefits

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5 Things You Must Think About Before Choosing Your 2016 Employee Benefits

5 Things You Must Think About Before Choosing Your 2016 Employee Benefits

Each year around November, many of us get an opportunity to enroll in our company’s employee benefit programs. You may receive a packet of information with health benefits, flexible spending account enrollment forms, life and disability insurance options and retirement plan information. It all can be a bit overwhelming. However, it is very important that... Read More

Physician Heal Thyself: Are Your Medical Records Safe?

Identity Theft

Physician Heal Thyself: Are Your Medical Records Safe?

Physician Heal Thyself: Are Your Medical Records Safe?

According to an article in Tech Times, healthcare providers in the U.S. may lose $305 billion in the next five years due to cyberattacks. One way those attacks keep happening: BYOD, or bring your device to work. One definition of insanity, according to Einstein (and my chief content officer Michael Schreiber), is to do the... Read More

How to Predict the Size of Your Next Major Medical Bill

Managing Debt

How to Predict the Size of Your Next Major Medical Bill

How to Predict the Size of Your Next Major Medical Bill

People avoid going to the doctor for many reasons, but cost is a huge deterrent. According to a 2014 report from the Kaiser Family Foundation, 26% of women and 20% of men delayed or went without health care because of the cost. Medical debt is no joke: For years, it has been the leading cause of... Read More

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