Nearly All Data Breaches Happen in Minutes, Report Finds

Identity Theft

Nearly All Data Breaches Happen in Minutes, Report Finds

Nearly All Data Breaches Happen in Minutes, Report Finds

Most data breaches happen fast — in a matter of minutes, according to a new Verizon report — but the impact on you and your credit report could make for a very long lasting financial headache. Cybercriminals institute data breaches to steal your Social Security number, credit card number, bank account information and many other forms of... Read More

429 Million Identities Were Stolen in Data Breaches Last Year

Identity Theft

429 Million Identities Were Stolen in Data Breaches Last Year

429 Million Identities Were Stolen in Data Breaches Last Year

Data breaches and other security crimes surged ahead in 2015, a new study found. A total of 429 million identities were stolen last year as a result of data breaches, according to Symantec. The security software company’s latest Internet Security Threat Report, released on April 12, notes that is a 23% increase from the prior... Read More

The Medical Identity Theft Apocalypse? Fear the Walking Files

Identity Theft

The Medical Identity Theft Apocalypse? Fear the Walking Files

The Medical Identity Theft Apocalypse? Fear the Walking Files

Criminal cyber attacks on healthcare information repositories have increased 125% since 2010. With the announcement of the Excellus breach last week, the total number of big-headline medical information compromises reported in 2015 (such as Anthem, Primera, Carefirst) had crossed the mind-blowing demarcation line of 100 million files. The Excellus breach exposed the names of clients... Read More

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