How to “Dilute” Your Bad Credit for a Higher Score

Credit Score

How to “Dilute” Your Bad Credit for a Higher Score

How to “Dilute” Your Bad Credit for a Higher Score

Is it possible to dilute your bad credit with good to boost your score? The Credit.com News & Advice Blog recently received the following comments from one of our readers: I had a lot of medical collection accounts from an illness about 1 1/2 years ago. I disputed all of the accounts and a couple… Read More

The Best Way to Raise your Credit Score

Credit 101

The Best Way to Raise your Credit Score

The Best Way to Raise your Credit Score

What is the best way to raise my credit score? Is it paying off old debts or is it paying on time that raises it? I have old debts and my credit report and I have old items on it. I was told if I cleaned it up it would help me. How do I do this?

How to Boost Your Credit in 15 Seconds

Credit Score

How to Boost Your Credit in 15 Seconds

How to Boost Your Credit in 15 Seconds

One of the most important credit score factors is your credit card debt-to-credit limit ratio (aka debt utilization ratio). Keeping your credit card balances below 10% of your credit limit can do wonders for your credit score. Inversely, having higher balances can really hurt your credit scores.

Reader Question: How do I Improve My Score?

Credit Score

Reader Question: How do I Improve My Score?

Reader Question: How do I Improve My Score?

Simple question, complex answer (isn’t that always true with credit?). The first question I had for Deb is where she got her credit score from. A 692 on the traditional FICO consumer score scale of 350-800 isn’t too bad and should be pretty easy to improve. However a 692 on a different credit scoring scale (500-900, 100-900) might represent a much more significant credit problem. It’s important to know which credit score you are purchasing and what scale the score is based on.

Bad credit advice from the New York Times

Credit Score

Bad credit advice from the New York Times

Bad credit advice from the New York Times

And the part about it taking six to 12 months to improve your credit scores? That’s crazy talk! There are a lot of corrections and improvements that you can make within 30 to 60 days. Since credit scores change in real time with the data on your credit reports, improvements can be fairly quick in many situations. For example: if you spot a fraudulent account on your credit report, the process of reporting and disputing the record can take about five weeks. Some mortgage lenders even offer “rapid rescoring” which allows you to dispute inaccuracies in days, not weeks.

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