Why the Average Affair Costs $2,600

Personal Finance

Why the Average Affair Costs $2,600

Why the Average Affair Costs $2,600

Beyond the emotional toll of extramarital affairs, philanderers and their families pay a large price for adultery. About $2,664, to be exact. That’s the cost of an average affair, according to a study from VoucherCloud. The data is based on surveys of 2,645 Americans 25 years and older who have been married to their current... Read More

10 Places With the Best Property Tax Value

Mortgages

10 Places With the Best Property Tax Value

10 Places With the Best Property Tax Value

Property taxes are an additional expense homeowners must factor into their budgets. But the idea is in return they get certain services — like public safety and public schools. A recent study released by financial technology company SmartAsset states the nearly 100,000 people living in the Georgia’s Floyd County are getting the best deal on property taxes... Read More

10 Ways to Buy a Car for Less

Auto Loans

10 Ways to Buy a Car for Less

10 Ways to Buy a Car for Less

After a house, a vehicle is probably the biggest purchase you’ll make. Unfortunately, while your house might appreciate — that is, gain value over time — your car will eventually turn into a nearly worthless hunk of metal, plastic and upholstery. Rather than pour oodles of cash into something whose value is going to drop like a... Read More

10 Ways to Get Free Lodging

Personal Finance

10 Ways to Get Free Lodging

10 Ways to Get Free Lodging

It’s summertime, and vacations are in full swing. Unfortunately, the cost of travel isn’t getting any lower. And lodging is one of the more expensive items on the list. But wouldn’t it be nice to eradicate that hefty travel expense? This may sound like a stretch, but it’s totally possible. Here are some ways to do... Read More

5 Mistakes That Can Doom Your Budget

Personal Finance

5 Mistakes That Can Doom Your Budget

5 Mistakes That Can Doom Your Budget

Making a budget is a great idea, but requires some action to make it happen. Sticking to that budget is just as important to financial success and also requires work. But budgets with oversights can make your hard work useless. To ensure that your budget is realistic and worthwhile, be sure to avoid these common... Read More

How Some Divorced Parents Hurt Their Credit

Credit Score

How Some Divorced Parents Hurt Their Credit

How Some Divorced Parents Hurt Their Credit

When parents fall behind on their child support payments, they may be surprised to learn those delinquent payments can appear on their credit reports. What does that mean for their credit scores? A Credit.com reader asks: I recently pulled my reports and was shocked to see the State of MO is listing my child support... Read More

How to Find & Fix Your Budget Leaks

Personal Finance

How to Find & Fix Your Budget Leaks

How to Find & Fix Your Budget Leaks

Drip, drip, drip. If you have leaks in your finances, you could be wasting money and not even realize it. Even if you feel pretty on top of your finances, money could still be slipping away. It’s a good idea to review budgets, payments and financial choices every so often to look for places where... Read More

How Businesses Can Get Serious About Privacy & Security

Identity Theft

How Businesses Can Get Serious About Privacy & Security

How Businesses Can Get Serious About Privacy & Security

In May 2014, Gregg Steinhafel, Target’s President, CEO and Chairman of the Board, resigned following a 2013 data breach that resulted in the theft of 110 million credit and debit card transaction records. Seventy million of those records contained customers’ addresses and telephone numbers – putting those affected at risk of identity theft. Experts have... Read More

The Most Expensive Public Colleges in America

Students

The Most Expensive Public Colleges in America

The Most Expensive Public Colleges in America

Students who attend a four-year, in-state public college pay an average of $11,582 a year, according to new data from the Department of Education. Plenty of students pay a lot more than that, with some paying more than double the average. When considering the cost of college, prospective students and their families need to consider... Read More

5 Mistakes Car Buyers Make

Auto Loans

5 Mistakes Car Buyers Make

5 Mistakes Car Buyers Make

If you need a new set of wheels, the idea of a change (or at least reliable transportation) has undeniable appeal, but figuring out which car you want and can afford, whether to buy new or used, plus whether you’re getting the best deal, can quickly take the fun out of shopping. It’s easy to... Read More

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