10 Ways to Fight High Medical Bills

Managing Debt

10 Ways to Fight High Medical Bills

10 Ways to Fight High Medical Bills

We may all have health insurance now, but that doesn’t make our medical bills magically disappear. No, we still have plenty to pay out-of-pocket. In recent years, employers have shifted a greater portion of health care costs to workers. The 19th annual Towers Watson/National Business Group on Health employer survey found that employees now pay for 37%... Read More

What to Look for When Searching for a New Home

Mortgages

What to Look for When Searching for a New Home

What to Look for When Searching for a New Home

The process of finding the perfect home usually has many steps. Once you’ve determined how much house you can afford, you can look seriously at the options. While some things may be obvious right away, such as a broken window, others require you to pay a little more attention. Here are four specifics to check... Read More

I’m 56 & Reinventing My Career

Personal Finance

I’m 56 & Reinventing My Career

I’m 56 & Reinventing My Career

America: What’s your money story? Credit.com contributor Bob Sullivan is hitting the road to ask the people he meets across the U.S. that very question. Whether it’s your struggle with student loans, what you did when you lost your job, how you dealt with a house that was underwater or the ingenious way you paid... Read More

The Biggest Retirement Mistakes You’re Making

Personal Finance

The Biggest Retirement Mistakes You’re Making

The Biggest Retirement Mistakes You’re Making

We may love to dream and fantasize about our retirement, but we usually don’t look forward to the retirement planning. Thinking about a long-term goal like retirement can be overwhelming, but it can also be inspiring. Sometimes knowing what we are working toward can help motivate us to establish healthy financial habits and get there.... Read More

Legislators Propose Interest Rate Cap, But Will It Work?

Personal Loans

Legislators Propose Interest Rate Cap, But Will It Work?

Legislators Propose Interest Rate Cap, But Will It Work?

Congress is taking aim at high-rate, short-term lenders in the U.S. Representatives Matt Cartwright and Steve Cohn are joining forces with Senators Dick Durbin, Barbara Boxer, Richard Blumenthal, Jeff Merkley and Sheldon Whitehouse to establish a national usury limit for consumer credit transactions. Their targets are banks and finance companies that market payday- and account-advance... Read More

How I Got My Credit Score to 847

Credit 101

How I Got My Credit Score to 847

How I Got My Credit Score to 847

Before I had a credit card — before I even knew what a credit card was — I knew credit card debt was something to be avoided at all costs. I hadn’t yet graduated from banking of the piggy variety, and my mom already had me thinking about debt. She used my childhood curiosity as... Read More

Is Your Car Loan Too Expensive?

Auto Loans

Is Your Car Loan Too Expensive?

Is Your Car Loan Too Expensive?

As the U.S. economy recovers from the recession, many lenders have eased financing standards, resulting in an increase in loans available to consumers with poor credit. The earliest and strongest recovery came in the auto market, and while a bump in subprime used-car lending has triggered some murmuring of a bubble, it appears to be... Read More

At 3 Years Old, the CFPB Gives Americans a Soapbox

Personal Finance

At 3 Years Old, the CFPB Gives Americans a Soapbox

At 3 Years Old, the CFPB Gives Americans a Soapbox

America’s newest federal agency just turned 3 years old, and it continues to be the preferred punching bag for everyone from the American Bankers Association to politicians like Rep. Spencer Bachus (R-Ala.), who once famously and proudly proclaimed that, “Washington and the regulators are there to serve the banks.” The CFPB, on the other hand,... Read More

My Spouse Has Dementia & I Can’t Cancel His Credit Card

Credit Cards

My Spouse Has Dementia & I Can’t Cancel His Credit Card

My Spouse Has Dementia & I Can’t Cancel His Credit Card

A reader wrote to us to ask about canceling a credit card belonging to her husband, who has dementia. The card, which had never been used, had begun to charge an annual fee. She has power of attorney, but the card issuer still refused to allow her to close the account. She wrote: Since I can’t close the account... Read More

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