3 Ways Student Loan Scammers Seduce You

Students

3 Ways Student Loan Scammers Seduce You

3 Ways Student Loan Scammers Seduce You

Millions of Americans dream of the day they’ll be free from student loan debt, but for so many, it feels like that day will never come. Even with President Barack Obama’s recent executive order capping student loan payments at 10% of monthly income, former college students across the nation struggle to afford their loan bills, and... Read More

The Ambulance Loophole That Could Cost You Big

Managing Debt

The Ambulance Loophole That Could Cost You Big

The Ambulance Loophole That Could Cost You Big

When Jo-Anne deLeon called 911 last month because her husband Jimmy was having a heart attack, two ambulances showed up at her house. Then, a $750 bill showed up. The bill wasn’t for the ambulance, or the ride. It was for the paramedic inside ambulance No. 2, after he jumped into ambulance No. 1. The... Read More

How I Repaid $5K of Debt While Making $21K a Year

Managing Debt

How I Repaid $5K of Debt While Making $21K a Year

How I Repaid $5K of Debt While Making $21K a Year

Kim Mathis couldn’t seem to catch a break. Almost 16 years ago, shortly after she gave birth to her youngest daughter, Dantina, Kim’s brother asked her if she could help take care of her parents, both in failing health. They were divorced and living in different parts of Philadelphia; her father had terminal lung and... Read More

5 Ways Your Kids Can Bust Your Summer Budget

Personal Finance

5 Ways Your Kids Can Bust Your Summer Budget

5 Ways Your Kids Can Bust Your Summer Budget

If you’re a parent, summertime can mean trips to the beach (along with parking fees, ice cream runs, boardwalk arcade games, funnel cakes, cotton candy, gaily painted hermit crabs, etc.), setting up camp on some far-away stunning vista (and all the must-have sundries and amenities) and, of course, hours of mindless — not necessarily inexpensive... Read More

I Went Into Debt to Look Like Kim Kardashian

Personal Finance

I Went Into Debt to Look Like Kim Kardashian

I Went Into Debt to Look Like Kim Kardashian

Getting paid to impersonate Kim Kardashian is apparently not enough to pay for all the surgery it takes to look like her in the first place. Claire Leeson, a 24-year-old Londoner, knows this from experience, Metro reports, but she doesn’t seem too bothered by the collectors hounding her for the $30,000 of credit card debt... Read More

Is Free Wi-Fi Dangerous?

Identity Theft

Is Free Wi-Fi Dangerous?

Is Free Wi-Fi Dangerous?

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey last month approved a plan to offer free Wi-Fi in New York City area airports this fall. At the moment, travelers can access the Internet for $4.95 an hour, $7.95 for 24 hours or $9.95 a month for access at Boingo Wireless hotspots across the globe,... Read More

What Should I Do With a Credit Card I Never Use?

Credit Cards

What Should I Do With a Credit Card I Never Use?

What Should I Do With a Credit Card I Never Use?

They are the knickknacks of your personal financial lives: those old credit cards you seldom use. You might dust them off occasionally and charge something, but they often remain tucked away in a drawer or wallet, unused and overlooked. Every once in a while, though, you may wonder what do they do to your credit... Read More

8 Celebrities Who Live on a Budget

Personal Finance

8 Celebrities Who Live on a Budget

8 Celebrities Who Live on a Budget

Keira Knightly made waves when she recently told Glamour magazine that she gives herself an allowance of just $50,000 a year. The actress reportedly has a net worth of $50 million (remember all those Pirates of the Caribbean films?). “I think living an [expensive] lifestyle means you can’t hang out with people who don’t live that lifestyle,”... Read More

Why Your Job Matters When Buying a Home

Mortgages

Why Your Job Matters When Buying a Home

Why Your Job Matters When Buying a Home

Did you recently change jobs or receive a promotion? Despite what you might have heard, it is still possible to qualify for a mortgage to buy or refinance a home using your new income. The lending atmosphere is rife with misconceptions about job gaps, job changes and occupational changes within the course of an employment time... Read More

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