5 Reasons to Live in a Big City

Mortgages

5 Reasons to Live in a Big City

5 Reasons to Live in a Big City

Where you live can have a huge impact on your ability to save and spend, as well as your lifestyle. There are many reasons to choose a place to live. Cost, weather, demographics, crime, recent growth, school performance, and proximity to work may affect your choice on which neighborhood is best for you. If you’re moving... Read More

9 Seriously Unhealthy Meals

Personal Finance

9 Seriously Unhealthy Meals

9 Seriously Unhealthy Meals

We’re missing a word in the English language. We need something that means both mouth-watering and nauseating. As someone who probably eats his weight in bacon annually, that was my initial response to a recent study on extreme eating by The Center for Science in the Public Interest. Just look at “The Big Hook Up”... Read More

Can a Prenup Protect Your Credit Score?

Credit Score

Can a Prenup Protect Your Credit Score?

Can a Prenup Protect Your Credit Score?

You may think a prenup agreement is something only celebrities and those with lots of or assets should consider. If so, think again. “Just the act of creating a prenup, requiring you to discuss each other’s assets and liabilities can help,” says Terry Savage, financial expert and co-author of The New Love Deal: Everything You... Read More

3 Ways You Can Get Your Credit Score for Free

Credit Score

3 Ways You Can Get Your Credit Score for Free

3 Ways You Can Get Your Credit Score for Free

Lenders and some service providers use your credit history as part of their decision to do business with you. Credit scores (numbers based on the information in your credit history) are an easy way for those people to understand how risky a borrower you are, and while credit standing isn’t the only factor in lending... Read More

12 Items You Should Buy Generic

Personal Finance

12 Items You Should Buy Generic

12 Items You Should Buy Generic

What does your loyalty to brand-name products stem from? Do you think the items are truly superior in quality, or have you been won over by fancy marketing campaigns? Either way, it’s likely you’re spending more than you need to just for a label. A new study “estimates Americans are wasting about $44 billion a year on... Read More

Should You Buy a Fixer-Upper?

Mortgages

Should You Buy a Fixer-Upper?

Should You Buy a Fixer-Upper?

When you are in the market for a new home, finding the right property while staying in your budget can be a challenge. You may have to make some compromises on your desires to make the process more affordable. An option for homebuyers on the hunt for a bargain may be an older home that needs... Read More

How to Save on Back-to-School Shopping

Personal Finance

How to Save on Back-to-School Shopping

How to Save on Back-to-School Shopping

Back to school is the second-biggest shopping season of the year (coming in after the holiday season). While buying new clothes and school supplies may be what your child looks forward to most about returning to the classroom, you should not have to spend a fortune every year. Below are some tips to save big... Read More

Are You Committing These 10 Deadly Credit Card Sins?

Credit Cards

Are You Committing These 10 Deadly Credit Card Sins?

Are You Committing These 10 Deadly Credit Card Sins?

Credit cards are a double-edged sword. They can be beneficial if used wisely, or wreak havoc on your finances and your credit if handled irresponsibly. To help prevent the latter, here are some credit card sins you definitely want to avoid: 1. Ignoring Your Credit Profile When was the last time you accessed your credit profile and... Read More

Debt Collectors’ Jobs Just Got Harder

Managing Debt

Debt Collectors’ Jobs Just Got Harder

Debt Collectors’ Jobs Just Got Harder

A new court ruling may be giving more power to consumers trying to figure out if a debt collector’s phone call means they actually owe that debt. A July 16 ruling by the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals elaborated on debt collectors’ obligation to respond to debt-verification requests, requiring collectors to provide details on the... Read More

How Americans Actually Pay for College

Students

How Americans Actually Pay for College

How Americans Actually Pay for College

Undergraduate borrowing hit a five-year low last year, with the typical family taking out $4,610 in combined parent and student education loans to finance the 2013-14 academic term, according to a new report from Sallie Mae. Student borrowing among low-income families dropped significantly, making up only 14% of their funding (as opposed to 22% the... Read More

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