The Most & Least Expensive States for Owning a Car

Auto Loans

The Most & Least Expensive States for Owning a Car

The Most & Least Expensive States for Owning a Car

The average Iowa driver spends about $315 a year in auto repairs and $630 annually for insurance, helping make it the cheapest state to operate a vehicle, according to a recent Bankrate report. Drivers in other states aren’t quite that lucky. Drivers in the Midwest have some of the lowest annual vehicle expenses, based on... Read More

How First-Time Homebuyers Can Save Big on Their Mortgage

Mortgages

How First-Time Homebuyers Can Save Big on Their Mortgage

How First-Time Homebuyers Can Save Big on Their Mortgage

With their low down payments and credit requirements, FHA mortgages experienced a surge in popularity as other lending dried up in the wake of the housing market crash. More recently, however, they’ve lost some of that luster as a series of fee increases have made them a less attractive option than they were a few... Read More

The Heartbleed Bug Is Still Beating

Identity Theft

The Heartbleed Bug Is Still Beating

The Heartbleed Bug Is Still Beating

In the aftermath of the Heartbleed Bug‘s discovery, the security flaw continues to spark security concerns. The Heartbleed Bug was revealed in many of the world’s most popular sites in April, and Internet users were shocked at its scope. From retail sites to social networks, it seemed as though no Internet giant was immune to... Read More

Strangers Moved Into Man’s New House, Changed the Locks

Mortgages

Strangers Moved Into Man’s New House, Changed the Locks

Strangers Moved Into Man’s New House, Changed the Locks

Closing on a home is supposed to be the happy, celebratory, “I did it!” moment of the often-stressful process of buying a house. Unfortunately for a new homeowner in Portland, Ore., that’s when the problems really started. Rod Nylund bought a house in the city and hired a contractor to do some work at the... Read More

3 Money Lessons for Your Kids Before They Go to College

Student Loans

3 Money Lessons for Your Kids Before They Go to College

3 Money Lessons for Your Kids Before They Go to College

University campuses are bustling once again as students arrive for the fall semester, some moving into their first dorm room or signing up for their first college campuses. As parents send off their children and talk to them during their first days as college students, there are all sorts of things they want to say,... Read More

Millennials Are Better at Paying Their Mortgage Than You

Mortgages

Millennials Are Better at Paying Their Mortgage Than You

Millennials Are Better at Paying Their Mortgage Than You

Mortgage borrowers younger than 30 years old have the lowest rate of delinquency on their home loans than any other age group, a new report from TransUnion shows, with only 2.34% of mortgages 60 or more days past due. Overall, the mortgage delinquency rate declined about 20% in the last year, from 4.32% in the... Read More

Can You Crowdfund Your Mortgage?

Mortgages

Can You Crowdfund Your Mortgage?

Can You Crowdfund Your Mortgage?

By now, you’ve probably heard of the guy who crowdfunded a $10 potato salad “campaign” and ended up raising more than $55,000 (if not, now you know — crazy, right?). That got us at Credit.com thinking: What other sorts of things can you crowdfund? The short answer: Pretty much anything (see: potato salad guy). Earlier... Read More

My Biggest Credit Card Mistake: Experts Share Their Stories

Credit Cards

My Biggest Credit Card Mistake: Experts Share Their Stories

My Biggest Credit Card Mistake: Experts Share Their Stories

Nobody’s perfect. Even when you spend all day trying to learn everything you can about a subject, you still make mistakes. For instance, even some of the top credit card experts have made some embarrassing moves, yet we were all willing to share them so that you can learn from our experiences. Brian Kelly Brian... Read More

Can You Get a Loan to Adopt a Child?

Personal Loans

Can You Get a Loan to Adopt a Child?

Can You Get a Loan to Adopt a Child?

What does it cost to adopt a child? The answer a friend gave when she was asked was “a lot less than it’s worth.” But while the value of a child can’t be calculated, would-be adoptive parents need to have some idea of the amount of money they will need as they go through the adoption process.... Read More

Debt Collector Sentenced to Over 14 Years in Prison

Managing Debt

Debt Collector Sentenced to Over 14 Years in Prison

Debt Collector Sentenced to Over 14 Years in Prison

How’s this for a nightmare scenario: A Minnesota man was busted and sentenced to prison for stealing identities while working as a legitimate debt collector. Khemall Jokhoo, 36, is the kind of guy who gives debt collectors a bad name: He was sentenced Aug. 20 to 14 1/2 years in federal prison on 33 counts... Read More

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