ApplePay: The Security Pros & Cons

Credit Cards

ApplePay: The Security Pros & Cons

ApplePay: The Security Pros & Cons

ApplePay, the new mobile payments service introduced by Apple this week, could ultimately set the security and privacy benchmarks for digital wallets much higher. Even so, the hunt for security holes and privacy gaps in Apple’s new digital wallet has commenced. It won’t take long for both white-hat researchers and well-funded criminal hackers to uncover... Read More

What Credit Score Do I Need to Buy a Car?

Auto Loans

What Credit Score Do I Need to Buy a Car?

What Credit Score Do I Need to Buy a Car?

You know it’s time to for a new vehicle, but there’s one thing holding you back: your credit. You aren’t sure what credit score you need to buy a car. If you absolutely must get another vehicle, you can probably find a way to finance it. The real question is what it will cost you. The better... Read More

3 Ways Your Kids Can Get You Hacked

Identity Theft

3 Ways Your Kids Can Get You Hacked

3 Ways Your Kids Can Get You Hacked

Last month a story in the Wall Street Journal article sent a shudder down our collective parental spine. Google is planning to open Gmail and YouTube to kids under the age of 13. While the company will restrict this king’s ransom of new clicks to kid-friendly content, hackers could well have a field day. Lest... Read More

4 Credit Card Rewards Nightmares

Credit Cards

4 Credit Card Rewards Nightmares

4 Credit Card Rewards Nightmares

Rewards travel enthusiasts love to use credit cards to earn points and miles that they redeem for award travel. Others appreciate cash-back credit cards that amount to a discount on their purchases. But not everyone is happy with their rewards credit cards. Cardholders can lose their hard-earned rewards in a variety of ways, or they might... Read More

5 Ways to Avoid Bank Fees

Personal Finance

5 Ways to Avoid Bank Fees

5 Ways to Avoid Bank Fees

The majority of Americans pay little or nothing at all for banking services, a new survey from the American Bankers Association found, and the share of those who pay fees has gotten smaller since last year. Of 1,000 consumers who responded to the annual survey (ABA has commissioned it since 1998), 62% said they pay... Read More

The $1 Million Parking Space

Personal Finance

The $1 Million Parking Space

The $1 Million Parking Space

It’s common knowledge New York City is home to some of the priciest real estate in the country, but still, paying $1 million for a parking space is a little excessive. A luxury building under construction in the trendy SoHo neighborhood will offer the pricey parking spots on a first-come, first-served basis, and they cost... Read More

Can Your Cellphone Break Your Credit Card?

Credit Cards

Can Your Cellphone Break Your Credit Card?

Can Your Cellphone Break Your Credit Card?

When you hand your credit card to a cashier, you expect it to work. It’s a reasonable assumption, but plenty of consumers have had the experience of swiping a card multiple times to no avail. For some reason, the reader won’t recognize your card — it might happen once in a while, repeatedly at the same... Read More

Report Indicates Not All Student Loan News is Horrible

Students

Report Indicates Not All Student Loan News is Horrible

Report Indicates Not All Student Loan News is Horrible

It’s not like student loan news is often uplifting, but the newest study on education debt released by Experian bears some encouraging data. The numbers reinforce concerns often voiced by borrowers, economists and politicians that the cost of higher education is growing at what is likely an unsustainable rate. However, the report also shows that... Read More

Are You Financially Ready to Buy a House?

Mortgages

Are You Financially Ready to Buy a House?

Are You Financially Ready to Buy a House?

One way to gauge if you are financially ready to buy a home is to ask yourself the following four questions: 1. Is My Credit in Good Shape? Before lenders approve a home loan, they will analyze your ability to repay it. To make this determination, lenders will obtain your credit report from one or... Read More

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