Even Obama’s Credit Card Has Been Declined

Credit Cards

Even Obama’s Credit Card Has Been Declined

Even Obama’s Credit Card Has Been Declined

Following a speech Friday at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in which President Obama discussed an executive order that would require security upgrades to government-issued debit and credit cards, the commander in chief shared one of his own experiences with credit cards… and not a positive one. He discussed an awkward moment at a restaurant... Read More

How Soon Can I Buy a House After Bankruptcy?

Mortgages

How Soon Can I Buy a House After Bankruptcy?

How Soon Can I Buy a House After Bankruptcy?

Bouncing back from bankruptcy or foreclosure takes time. But that doesn’t mean you have to shelve your homebuying aspirations for some interminable stretch. They’re called “boomerang buyers” for a reason. Consumers may be able to close on a home loan just a couple years removed from one (or both) of these fiscal hiccups. A lot... Read More

5 Signs You Can Retire Early

Personal Finance

5 Signs You Can Retire Early

5 Signs You Can Retire Early

While you’re at work, it can be comforting to dream about the possibility of retirement — planning the activities, calculating how much savings you need to retire and beginning the countdown. But maybe you don’t have to wait as long as you thought. If you are willing to work hard and plan harder early in your... Read More

7 Things to Do When You Get a New Credit Card

Credit Cards

7 Things to Do When You Get a New Credit Card

7 Things to Do When You Get a New Credit Card

A mysterious, non-descript envelope finds its way into your mailbox one day. It weighs a bit more than other letters, so you open it up to find a shiny new credit card. Perhaps you have recently opened a new account, or maybe it is a replacement for a card that has been lost, stolen, or... Read More

850,000 Job Seekers May Have Been Exposed By Government Data Breach

Identity Theft

850,000 Job Seekers May Have Been Exposed By Government Data Breach

850,000 Job Seekers May Have Been Exposed By Government Data Breach

The Oregon Department of Employment has identified more than 850,000 Oregonians whose personal information may have been compromised by a security vulnerability in its job search database, WorkSource Oregon. Unemployed Oregonians register for the database, adding their names, addresses, Social Security numbers and other information often found on job applications as they seek work. The... Read More

Government Workers Go On Credit Card Spending Spree & You Get the Bill

Personal Finance

Government Workers Go On Credit Card Spending Spree & You Get the Bill

Government Workers Go On Credit Card Spending Spree & You Get the Bill

A lot of people have trouble keeping their credit card spending under control — ideally, those people aren’t government employees using taxpayer-funded payment cards. In a congressional hearing Tuesday, federal auditors described purchase-card misuse across several government departments, amounting to millions of dollars of misused or wasted government funds. It’s not the first time this problem... Read More

Why the Feds Need to Step In on Payday Loans

Personal Finance

Why the Feds Need to Step In on Payday Loans

Why the Feds Need to Step In on Payday Loans

The Pew Charitable Trusts recently released the fourth report in its series Payday Lending in America. The focus this time is on fraud and abuse in online lending. The report calls out payday loan structures that are designed to prolong indebtedness by front-loading fees on loans that average 650% APR. It also describes incidents of unauthorized withdrawals... Read More

Troubled Private Student Loan Borrowers Get Little Help, CFPB Says

Students

Troubled Private Student Loan Borrowers Get Little Help, CFPB Says

Troubled Private Student Loan Borrowers Get Little Help, CFPB Says

Borrowers stuck with oppressive private student loan debts continue to get little mercy from lenders, which is bad for both consumers and the financial institutions, according to a report issued Thursday by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. While distressed mortgage holders have several opportunities to appeal for lower monthly payments, and federal student loan borrowers... Read More

The States With the Highest Foreclosure Rates

Mortgages

The States With the Highest Foreclosure Rates

The States With the Highest Foreclosure Rates

U.S. foreclosure activity declined in September, reaching the lowest number of properties with a foreclosure filing since July 2006: 106,866. That’s down 9% from August and down 19% from last September, according to the monthly RealtyTrac foreclosure report, marking the 48th consecutive month of year-over-year declines in the foreclosure rate. September was also the final... Read More

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