9 Things to Do When Faced with Foreclosure

Mortgages

9 Things to Do When Faced with Foreclosure

9 Things to Do When Faced with Foreclosure

For most of us, foreclosure seems like an abstraction –– like the Boogie Man, or Tooth Fairy.  And yet, foreclosure is a reality that many American families deal with every single day. With a rapidly changing economy and the uncertainty of guaranteed employment or good health, foreclosure can creep up on you at the most... Read More

Creating Your Own Pension

Personal Finance

Creating Your Own Pension

Creating Your Own Pension

Pension plans used to be an incredibly popular retirement vehicle for countless workers. In 1975, an impressive 88% of private sector American workers had a pension sponsored by an employer. Thirty years later that figure had dropped to 33%. As pensions disappeared, many turned to 401K plans and savings accounts to fill the gap. However,... Read More

What to Do with Your Old Credit Cards

Credit Cards

What to Do with Your Old Credit Cards

What to Do with Your Old Credit Cards

You know that “starter” credit card collecting dust in your wallet? The one with a high interest rate, lackluster benefits, and zero rewards? Now that you’ve upgraded to a better card, you might be tempted to close your old cards and never look back. Not so fast! Canceling your old credit cards can actually hurt... Read More

Are Cash Back Debit Cards an Alternative to Credit Cards?

Credit Cards

Are Cash Back Debit Cards an Alternative to Credit Cards?

Are Cash Back Debit Cards an Alternative to Credit Cards?

[Update: Some offers mentioned below have expired. For current terms and conditions, please see card agreements.] It’s hardly a secret that millennials loathe credit card debt. They fear it, in some cases more than other very frightening life events. It was widely reported last year that debt conscious millennials are disrupting the credit card industry... Read More

12 Things to Think About Before Renting a Home

Mortgages

12 Things to Think About Before Renting a Home

12 Things to Think About Before Renting a Home

2018 is an exciting time to be moving. Housing markets across the country are booming and home-finder sites like Padmapper are ablaze with the prospect of the perfect rental. But leasing an apartment is no simple task; whether you’re a seasoned lease or new to the world of renting, here are 12 things to consider... Read More

Credit Cards No Longer Require Signatures

Credit Cards

Credit Cards No Longer Require Signatures

Credit Cards No Longer Require Signatures

Earlier this month, the need to provide a signature for credit card purchases quietly and officially went the way of the dinosaur. As of April 14, major companies as Discover, Mastercard and Amex phased out use of signatures to verify credit card transactions at the point of sale. What that means in practice is that... Read More

7 Ways to Save More for Your Upcoming Vacation

Personal Finance

7 Ways to Save More for Your Upcoming Vacation

7 Ways to Save More for Your Upcoming Vacation

Affordable vacations can be difficult to plan. Maybe you have a dream destination, but you can’t quite save up enough for travel costs. Or maybe you can get yourself there, but you’d have to live on bread and water for the entire trip. If your vacation expenses are just out of reach, a few adjustments... Read More

Don’t Let Your Vacation Wreck Your Credit

Personal Finance

Don’t Let Your Vacation Wreck Your Credit

Don’t Let Your Vacation Wreck Your Credit

Article Updated by Brian Acton May 22, 2018 Summer vacations are supposed to be carefree and enjoyable, with your biggest challenge being the choice between flip-flops and sandals. But in reality, you need to do a little proactive planning to keep your finances safe. Credit never takes a holiday, and ignoring it on vacation could... Read More

When Can I Get a Bankruptcy Off My Credit Report?

Credit Score

When Can I Get a Bankruptcy Off My Credit Report?

When Can I Get a Bankruptcy Off My Credit Report?

Article updated by Mia Taylor May 21, 2018 Filing for bankruptcy in order to deal with overwhelming debts can be a frightening and confusing prospect. But if you’re among those who have opted to use this approach in order to turn a troublesome financial picture around, you’re probably wondering what the next step should be.... Read More

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Hello, Reader!

Thanks for checking out Credit.com. We hope you find the site and the journalism we produce useful. We wanted to take some time to tell you a bit about ourselves.

Our People

The Credit.com editorial team is staffed by a team of editors and reporters, each with many years of financial reporting experience. We’ve worked for places like the New York Times, American Banker, Frontline, TheStreet.com, Business Insider, ABC News, NBC News, CNBC and many others. We also employ a few freelancers and more than 50 contributors (these are typically subject matter experts from the worlds of finance, academia, politics, business and elsewhere).

Our Reporting

We take great pains to ensure that the articles, video and graphics you see on Credit.com are thoroughly reported and fact-checked. Each story is read by two separate editors, and we adhere to the highest editorial standards. We’re not perfect, however, and if you see something that you think is wrong, please email us at editorial team [at] credit [dot] com,

The Credit.com editorial team is committed to providing our readers and viewers with sound, well-reported and understandable information designed to inform and empower. We won’t tell you what to do. We will, however, do our best to explain the consequences of various actions, thereby arming you with the information you need to make decisions that are in your best interests. We also write about things relating to money and finance we think are interesting and want to share.

In addition to appearing on Credit.com, our articles are syndicated to dozens of other news sites. We have more than 100 partners, including MSN, ABC News, CBS News, Yahoo, Marketwatch, Scripps, Money Magazine and many others. This network operates similarly to the Associated Press or Reuters, except we focus almost exclusively on issues relating to personal finance. These are not advertorial or paid placements, rather we provide these articles to our partners in most cases for free. These relationships create more awareness of Credit.com in general and they result in more traffic to us as well.

Our Business Model

Credit.com’s journalism is largely supported by an e-commerce business model. Rather than rely on revenue from display ad impressions, Credit.com maintains a financial marketplace separate from its editorial pages. When someone navigates to those pages, and applies for a credit card, for example, Credit.com will get paid what is essentially a finder’s fee if that person ends up getting the card. That doesn’t mean, however, that our editorial decisions are informed by the products available in our marketplace. The editorial team chooses what to write about and how to write about it independently of the decisions and priorities of the business side of the company. In fact, we maintain a strict and important firewall between the editorial and business departments. Our mission as journalists is to serve the reader, not the advertiser. In that sense, we are no different from any other news organization that is supported by ad revenue.

Visitors to Credit.com are also able to register for a free Credit.com account, which gives them access to a tool called The Credit Report Card. This tool provides users with two free credit scores and a breakdown of the information in their Experian credit report, updated twice monthly. Again, this tool is entirely free, and we mention that frequently in our articles, because we think that it’s a good thing for users to have access to data like this. Separate from its educational value, there is also a business angle to the Credit Report Card. Registered users can be matched with products and services for which they are most likely to qualify. In other words, if you register and you find that your credit is less than stellar, Credit.com won’t recommend a high-end platinum credit card that requires an excellent credit score You’d likely get rejected, and that’s no good for you or Credit.com. You’d be no closer to getting a product you need, there’d be a wasted inquiry on your credit report, and Credit.com wouldn’t get paid. These are essentially what are commonly referred to as "targeted ads" in the world of the Internet. Despite all of this, however, even if you never apply for any product, the Credit Report Card will remain free, and none of this will impact how the editorial team reports on credit and credit scores.



Your Stories

Lastly, much of what we do is informed by our own experiences as well as the experiences of our readers. We want to tell your stories if you’re interested in sharing them. Please email us at story ideas [at] credit [dot] com with ideas or visit us on Facebook or Twitter.

Thanks for stopping by.

- The Credit.com Editorial Team