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Sarah Szczypinski

In Managing Debt

Sarah Szczypinski is a journalist specializing in credit repair, student loans, budgeting and other personal finance topics. Her work is featured on MSN, GOBankingRates, The Huffington Post, Lexington Law and CreditRepair.com, among others. She lives in Seattle with her husband and son.

Does Having Multiple Credit Cards Hurt or Help My Credit?

Credit Cards

Does Having Multiple Credit Cards Hurt or Help My Credit?

Does Having Multiple Credit Cards Hurt or Help My Credit?

Credit cards are a staple of Americans’ wallets. The average adult has at least two bank-issued accounts, according to Experian’s 2016 State of Credit report. Consumer credit plays a key role in financial health, and, when used wisely, can strengthen your stance in the credit score range and help you secure loans with the best interest rates. On the... Read More

Here’s What You Need to Know About Credit Utilization

Credit 101

Here’s What You Need to Know About Credit Utilization

Here’s What You Need to Know About Credit Utilization

Credit scoring is a mystery to many people, and for good reason. It’s not easy to understand the grading process or which factors matter most. While every lender has its own method for deciding which customers are worthy of financial trust, more than 90% of top U.S. businesses rely on the FICO score when reviewing credit and... Read More

4 Questions to Ask Before Buying a Rental Property

Personal Finance

4 Questions to Ask Before Buying a Rental Property

4 Questions to Ask Before Buying a Rental Property

If you’re obsessed with HGTV, remodeling and regularly use phrases like “reclaimed wood” and “farmhouse feel,” you’ve probably kicked around the idea of buying investment property. The popular TV niche has given birth to a group of people who are motivated to improve their incomes with do-it-yourself projects and tenants in tow. While it may... Read More

Will I Lose My Credit History If I Change My Name?

Credit 101

Will I Lose My Credit History If I Change My Name?

Will I Lose My Credit History If I Change My Name?

Thousands of people change their names each year, often as a result of marriage or divorce, and less frequently, just for fun. In fact, one man, armed with $50 and a written deed poll application, secured the moniker Bacon Double Cheeseburger in the United Kingdom last year. Although Mr. Cheeseburger may be perfectly satisfied with his... Read More

3 Ways Women Get Shortchanged Financially & What to Do About It

Personal Finance

3 Ways Women Get Shortchanged Financially & What to Do About It

3 Ways Women Get Shortchanged Financially & What to Do About It

Here’s a mind-bending fact: Women could not get a credit card without their husband’s signature until 1974. Women’s rights have been a national conversation since the age of suffrage — and conversations about equality are extremely prevalent in the news right now. While it’s all important, this piece is going to focus on the personal finance aspect of... Read More

4 Credit Card Features That Can Save You Time & Money

Credit Cards

4 Credit Card Features That Can Save You Time & Money

4 Credit Card Features That Can Save You Time & Money

[Update: Some offers mentioned below have expired. You can view the current offers from our partners here — Citi Prestige, American Express Platinum and Discover it.] You’re familiar with many of the things the plastic in your wallet can do for you — from simply helping you buy the items you need to giving you cash... Read More

5 Strategies to Help You Get the Salary You Want

Personal Finance

5 Strategies to Help You Get the Salary You Want

5 Strategies to Help You Get the Salary You Want

Few moments in the career growth process are more satisfying than receiving a coveted job offer, though for many, the contentment is short-lived once the conversation turns to salary. The topic of money can be challenging and downright uncomfortable, but there are a few ways to rise above the awkwardness to secure the salary you feel you... Read More

6 Ways to Stretch Your Retirement Income

Personal Finance

6 Ways to Stretch Your Retirement Income

6 Ways to Stretch Your Retirement Income

Retirement can be a polarizing thought for millions of Americans. On one hand, it represents the freedom to sleep late, travel, enjoy time with family and basically choose how to spend your time. On the other, it poses the ever-so-important question, “How will I pay for it?” If this is how you’re feeling, you aren’t alone... Read More

10 Affordable Ways to Upgrade Your Rental

Mortgages

10 Affordable Ways to Upgrade Your Rental

10 Affordable Ways to Upgrade Your Rental

The housing market crash of 2008 affected millions of Americans, and the effects weren’t limited to homeowners — renters felt the pinch too. In fact, according to a 2016 Trulia report, rental prices rose 22% from 2006 to 2014 in the 50 largest U.S. housing markets, despite the average household income shrinking by 4.2% within... Read More

5 Possible Benefits of Changing Your Bills’ Due Dates

Credit 101

5 Possible Benefits of Changing Your Bills’ Due Dates

5 Possible Benefits of Changing Your Bills’ Due Dates

Paying bills is a tedious necessity, and for many, it’s also an ongoing source of stress. According to the 8th annual Billing Household Study from Fiserv, a financial services provider, 35% of consumers paid at least one bill late in the past 12 months, and 65% also paid a late fee. So, why are these people struggling to meet... Read More

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Certain credit cards and other financial products mentioned in this and other sponsored content on Credit.com are Partners with Credit.com. Credit.com receives compensation if our users apply for and ultimately sign up for any financial products or cards offered.

Hello, Reader!

Thanks for checking out Credit.com. We hope you find the site and the journalism we produce useful. We wanted to take some time to tell you a bit about ourselves.

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The Credit.com editorial team is staffed by a team of editors and reporters, each with many years of financial reporting experience. We’ve worked for places like the New York Times, American Banker, Frontline, TheStreet.com, Business Insider, ABC News, NBC News, CNBC and many others. We also employ a few freelancers and more than 50 contributors (these are typically subject matter experts from the worlds of finance, academia, politics, business and elsewhere).

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The Credit.com editorial team is committed to providing our readers and viewers with sound, well-reported and understandable information designed to inform and empower. We won’t tell you what to do. We will, however, do our best to explain the consequences of various actions, thereby arming you with the information you need to make decisions that are in your best interests. We also write about things relating to money and finance we think are interesting and want to share.

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Credit.com’s journalism is largely supported by an e-commerce business model. Rather than rely on revenue from display ad impressions, Credit.com maintains a financial marketplace separate from its editorial pages. When someone navigates to those pages, and applies for a credit card, for example, Credit.com will get paid what is essentially a finder’s fee if that person ends up getting the card. That doesn’t mean, however, that our editorial decisions are informed by the products available in our marketplace. The editorial team chooses what to write about and how to write about it independently of the decisions and priorities of the business side of the company. In fact, we maintain a strict and important firewall between the editorial and business departments. Our mission as journalists is to serve the reader, not the advertiser. In that sense, we are no different from any other news organization that is supported by ad revenue.

Visitors to Credit.com are also able to register for a free Credit.com account, which gives them access to a tool called The Credit Report Card. This tool provides users with two free credit scores and a breakdown of the information in their Experian credit report, updated twice monthly. Again, this tool is entirely free, and we mention that frequently in our articles, because we think that it’s a good thing for users to have access to data like this. Separate from its educational value, there is also a business angle to the Credit Report Card. Registered users can be matched with products and services for which they are most likely to qualify. In other words, if you register and you find that your credit is less than stellar, Credit.com won’t recommend a high-end platinum credit card that requires an excellent credit score You’d likely get rejected, and that’s no good for you or Credit.com. You’d be no closer to getting a product you need, there’d be a wasted inquiry on your credit report, and Credit.com wouldn’t get paid. These are essentially what are commonly referred to as "targeted ads" in the world of the Internet. Despite all of this, however, even if you never apply for any product, the Credit Report Card will remain free, and none of this will impact how the editorial team reports on credit and credit scores.



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