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Rob Infantino

Contributor |  In Auto Loans

Rob Infantino is founder and CEO of Openbay, an online marketplace to cross-shop, book and pay for vehicle repair. He has always worked on cars, including transmission replacements and engine rebuilds, and spent years working on a pit crew. Rob holds a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from the University of Connecticut. A noted authority on car repair, Rob’s interviews have appeared in BBC Autos, Boston Globe, The Economist and NY Daily News.

6 Things to Consider Before You Start Carpooling

Auto Loans

6 Things to Consider Before You Start Carpooling

6 Things to Consider Before You Start Carpooling

Roughly three-fourths of Americans drive to work alone. It’s easy to understand why – driving solo means leaving your house and office on your own time, the ability to stop for any errand you like, or to catch up on the phone with colleagues, friends or family. But carpooling has its advantages too – namely,... Read More

7 Reasons Buying a Car May Be Smarter Than Leasing

Auto Loans

7 Reasons Buying a Car May Be Smarter Than Leasing

7 Reasons Buying a Car May Be Smarter Than Leasing

More than ever before, people are leasing their vehicles. Yet 75% of Americans believe that buying a vehicle is smarter than leasing one. Why? Karl Brauer, senior analyst, Kelley Blue Book’s KBB.com, summed it up: “Buying a car allows the owner to build equity in a vehicle and recoup some percentage of it when it’s time... Read More

7 Reasons Leasing a Car May Be Smarter for You

Auto Loans

7 Reasons Leasing a Car May Be Smarter for You

7 Reasons Leasing a Car May Be Smarter for You

Ten years ago, about 16% of new cars became lease vehicles. Today, nearly one in three vehicles on the road is leased. Whether you lease or buy your vehicle depends largely on your goals. If you’re looking to justify a lease, here’s why it might make more sense, along with some items you should try... Read More

5 Ways to Get the Best Trade-In Value for Your Car

Auto Loans

5 Ways to Get the Best Trade-In Value for Your Car

5 Ways to Get the Best Trade-In Value for Your Car

So you’ve got your heart set on a new car, and you’re ready to get rid of your current wheels. If you head to the dealership, they’ll take care of every detail – from a thorough cleaning to repairs – and its sale, but you’ll also get less money working through a dealer than if... Read More

8 Things You Need to Know Before Buying a New Car

Auto Loans

8 Things You Need to Know Before Buying a New Car

8 Things You Need to Know Before Buying a New Car

The good news is you’re in the market for a new car. The bad? You don’t even know where to begin. It always pays to comparison shop, and with so many sites dedicated to vehicle reviews, stats on reliability over time, information on the cost of vehicles over time, and even customer reviews of the... Read More

How to Read a Car Repair Estimate

Auto Loans

How to Read a Car Repair Estimate

How to Read a Car Repair Estimate

Unless you enjoy turning a wrench, car repair and maintenance is a necessary evil. Car repair bills always seem so unfair and often include repairs that didn’t really seem necessary. The whole experience is taxing, but with this list of suggestions, we can help shrink your repair bills, ensuring a better experience and a well-running... Read More

7 Cars That Cost More Than a House

Auto Loans

7 Cars That Cost More Than a House

7 Cars That Cost More Than a House

Ever weighed the decision between buying a Porsche 918 Spyder and a home in Berkeley, Calif.? Probably not, but they cost about the same. Next to paying for a house or college, a car is among the most expensive items many of us will buy. Eighty percent of cars on the road are out of... Read More

4 of the Priciest Car Repairs

Auto Loans

4 of the Priciest Car Repairs

4 of the Priciest Car Repairs

What better incentive to stay up on your car’s regularly scheduled maintenance than the possibility of having to pay through the nose for a costly repair? If you’re the kind of driver who never changes the oil, never rotates the tires, and never thinks about anything other than keeping the tank full of gas, odds are you’ve... Read More

7 Ways to Avoid Getting Overcharged By a Mechanic

Auto Loans

7 Ways to Avoid Getting Overcharged By a Mechanic

7 Ways to Avoid Getting Overcharged By a Mechanic

If you’re like the average American, your car was born the same year Apple’s iTunes store was launched, and when Janet Jackson had a wardrobe ‘malfunction’ at the Superbowl. In other words, the average car on the road is more than 11 years old, meaning your wheels are likely in need of regular love and... Read More

5 Tips to Prepare Your Car for Winter

Auto Loans

5 Tips to Prepare Your Car for Winter

5 Tips to Prepare Your Car for Winter

Those living in seasonal climes know that the days of perfectly crisp air and turning autumn leaves will soon come to a swift end, only to be replaced by violent, frigid temps. Breaking down by the side of the road is a nuisance even in clear, warm weather. Getting stuck on the side of a... Read More

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