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Nikelle Murphy

In Personal Finance

Nikelle Murphy is a writer and assistant editor for The Cheat Sheet. She graduated with a degree in magazine journalism and political science from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. Fresh flowers, Sour Patch watermelons, and beach vacations are a few of her favorite things.

The One Skill You Need to Master to Get Ahead At Work

Personal Finance

The One Skill You Need to Master to Get Ahead At Work

The One Skill You Need to Master to Get Ahead At Work

It’s time to stop the witch hunt against small talk. Many people believe the chitchat around the water cooler is pointless babble, but in fact it can be vital to achieving your career goals. Research is showing that the first impressions you make in a job interview — often with those exchanges about the weather... Read More

Layoffs? 5 Types of Employees Who Are Often First to Be Let Go

Personal Finance

Layoffs? 5 Types of Employees Who Are Often First to Be Let Go

Layoffs? 5 Types of Employees Who Are Often First to Be Let Go

Your company just made headlines for its quarterly losses. You hear concerned whispers as people pass by your cube, and your boss is holed up in his office like he’s defending secrets of national security. At this point, there’s only two questions you care about: Are layoffs happening, and will you be one of the people to get... Read More

This is Why Wages Haven’t Increased in 50 Years

Personal Finance

This is Why Wages Haven’t Increased in 50 Years

This is Why Wages Haven’t Increased in 50 Years

Most experts will agree the economy has improved dramatically from its pale, feeble days during and directly after the Great Recession. Unemployment is down (even if there are a few caveats), low interest rates make it easier to make big purchases, and the stock market has largely recovered, except for a few bumps along the way.... Read More

7 Reasons Why You Still Can’t Sell Your House

Personal Finance

7 Reasons Why You Still Can’t Sell Your House

7 Reasons Why You Still Can’t Sell Your House

You made the investment and bought a house, but now it’s time to sell it. Whether you’re looking for a different atmosphere, moving for work, or accounting for any number of factors, selling your home can be one of the most complex deals you make. You might be facing steep competition from other homes for... Read More

10 Signs That You May Have a Gambling Problem

Personal Finance

10 Signs That You May Have a Gambling Problem

10 Signs That You May Have a Gambling Problem

Perhaps your idea of a perfect weekend is flying to Las Vegas, picking out the casino games with the best odds, and allotting yourself a set amount of money to gamble. Maybe this is how you choose to spend the entertainment money in your budget, or you’re meeting your friends for a weekend getaway. Whatever... Read More

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