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Mitchell D. Weiss

Contributor |  In Students, Managing Debt

Mitchell D. Weiss is an experienced financial services industry executive and entrepreneur. He is an Executive in Residence at the University of Hartford and co-founder of the university’s Center for Personal Financial Responsibility. His books include Life Happens: A Practical Course on Personal Finance from College to Career
and Business Happens: A Practical Guide to Entrepreneurial Finance for Small Businesses and Professional Practices—both of which are now undergraduate courses that Mitch teaches at the university and elsewhere.

How the Incoming Trump Administration Can Help Student Loan Borrowers

Students

How the Incoming Trump Administration Can Help Student Loan Borrowers

How the Incoming Trump Administration Can Help Student Loan Borrowers

The 2016 presidential election is settled and a new administration will take office in two months’ time. Considering all that was said during this particularly contentious campaign, it’s no surprise that student loan borrowers are concerned about what that will mean to them beginning in 2017. Two of the many items on my list of... Read More

The Brainless ‘No-Brainer’ Fix to the Student Loan Problem

Students

The Brainless ‘No-Brainer’ Fix to the Student Loan Problem

The Brainless ‘No-Brainer’ Fix to the Student Loan Problem

You know what they say about opinions, right? Well, the same can be said about so-called no-brainer fixes to the student loan problem, as a recent Bloomberg.com article illustrates. This particular “fix” has to do with the 57% of federal student loan borrowers who were drop-kicked out of the government’s various income-based repayment (IBR) plans... Read More

When Does Paying Off Your Mortgage Ahead of Time Make Sense?

Mortgages

When Does Paying Off Your Mortgage Ahead of Time Make Sense?

When Does Paying Off Your Mortgage Ahead of Time Make Sense?

Many years ago, my wife and I hosted a neighborhood get together at our house. It was our first home, on which we closed at a time of great financial instability. The prime lending rate had climbed to an unprecedented 21.5% in December 1980. And, although the rate that we ended up paying for our... Read More

5 Reasons Why You Might Not Want to Refinance Your Federal Student Loans

Students

5 Reasons Why You Might Not Want to Refinance Your Federal Student Loans

5 Reasons Why You Might Not Want to Refinance Your Federal Student Loans

Many private student lenders are making a big push for a piece of the student loan refinancing pie. Banks and venture capital-backed nonbank financial services companies are hard at work slicing and dicing that trillion-dollar market into bite-size, demographically based refinancing opportunities. Their primary targets? Borrowers who have the best longer-term earnings potential because of... Read More

Graduating More College Students Doesn’t Solve the Student Loan Problem

Students

Graduating More College Students Doesn’t Solve the Student Loan Problem

Graduating More College Students Doesn’t Solve the Student Loan Problem

Earlier this month, another report on the high rate of student loan defaults once again triggered a great deal of discussion. Bloomberg followed this up with an article that parses the problem: defaults by borrowers who failed to complete their studies versus those who did, where the rate of default for the dropouts is many... Read More

The Student Loan Default Rate Is Way Worse Than You Think

Students

The Student Loan Default Rate Is Way Worse Than You Think

The Student Loan Default Rate Is Way Worse Than You Think

The Wall Street Journal’s Josh Mitchell recently authored an article in which he calls attention to the roughly 16% student loan debt default rate, as measured in terms of number of borrowers. That data point, by itself, is extraordinarily high. In proper context, it’s calamitous. At $125 billion in aggregate value, these defaulted loans represent... Read More

The Big Things Missing from Hillary Clinton’s Student Loan Plan

Students

The Big Things Missing from Hillary Clinton’s Student Loan Plan

The Big Things Missing from Hillary Clinton’s Student Loan Plan

Hillary Clinton unveiled her new and improved plan for making higher education more affordable. A few of her policy ideas are refreshed retreads, some others break new ground, and a few don’t do anything at all. For example: 1. “Students should never have to borrow to pay for tuition, books, and fees to attend a... Read More

Why All Government Student Loans Are Not Created Equal

Students

Why All Government Student Loans Are Not Created Equal

Why All Government Student Loans Are Not Created Equal

The timing of an article in The New York Times couldn’t have been more ironic. There we were, the day before we celebrate America’s Declaration of Independence, and the Times published an exposé on the hardball tactics that the State of New Jersey allegedly takes against student-loan borrowers who are unable to continue making their... Read More

If Student Loan Bills Are ‘Affordable,’ Why Are So Many Past Due?

Students

If Student Loan Bills Are ‘Affordable,’ Why Are So Many Past Due?

If Student Loan Bills Are ‘Affordable,’ Why Are So Many Past Due?

Math is infinite. Conjure up the largest number you can you can imagine and multiply that value by itself over and over again. You still wouldn’t reach an endpoint because there is none. I thought about all that as I read Dr. Joel Elvery’s intriguing article on student loan debt in a recent issue of... Read More

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