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Karla Bowsher

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Karla Bowsher writes for Money Talks News.

14 Ways to Never Pay Full Price for Anything

Personal Finance

14 Ways to Never Pay Full Price for Anything

14 Ways to Never Pay Full Price for Anything

A decade ago, retailers sold 15% to 20% of their merchandise at a discount. Today, they sell 40% to 45% at a discount, according to professional bargain hunter Mark Ellwood. “Never pay full price for anything — ever,” the journalist and author of “Bargain Fever: How to Shop in a Discounted World” tells USA Today. “If... Read More

18 Retailers That Offer Free In-Store Pickup For Online Orders

Personal Finance

18 Retailers That Offer Free In-Store Pickup For Online Orders

18 Retailers That Offer Free In-Store Pickup For Online Orders

As online competition has heated up, more retailers have started offering free store pickup for online orders. This gives customers another way to avoid shipping costs. Many national retail chains that sell products both online and in brick-and-mortar stores — from big-box stores to home-improvement stores to a dollar store — now offer the option of free store pickup.... Read More

429 Million Identities Were Stolen in Data Breaches Last Year

Identity Theft

429 Million Identities Were Stolen in Data Breaches Last Year

429 Million Identities Were Stolen in Data Breaches Last Year

Data breaches and other security crimes surged ahead in 2015, a new study found. A total of 429 million identities were stolen last year as a result of data breaches, according to Symantec. The security software company’s latest Internet Security Threat Report, released on April 12, notes that is a 23% increase from the prior... Read More

25 Retailers With Free Shipping

Personal Finance

25 Retailers With Free Shipping

25 Retailers With Free Shipping

Recently, Amazon decided yet again to hike the minimum amount you need to purchase to qualify for free shipping. Doing so has brought attention to the retail giant’s competitors with lower minimums. Amazon’s minimum is now $49 — a 40% increase — while Target, for example, requires online shoppers to spend a minimum of only $25... Read More

5 Home Upgrades That Can Lower Your Tax Bill

Personal Finance

5 Home Upgrades That Can Lower Your Tax Bill

5 Home Upgrades That Can Lower Your Tax Bill

Energy-efficient products might cost more than other models, but they essentially pay for themselves in reduced home energy costs, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Federal income tax credits can add to homeowners’ savings. Credits for five types of alternative-energy systems, like solar water heaters, are available through the new year. That means taxpayers who... Read More

The 10 Best 2016 Cars for Resale Value

Personal Finance

The 10 Best 2016 Cars for Resale Value

The 10 Best 2016 Cars for Resale Value

Trucks and SUVs not only can be cheaper to insure, but they also are more likely to hold on to their resale value. In the 2016 Kelley Blue Book Best Resale Value Awards, announced Wednesday, KBB notes that eight of the top 10 vehicles are trucks or SUVs: That fact is yet another example of the... Read More

The Best Cruise Ships of 2016

Personal Finance

The Best Cruise Ships of 2016

The Best Cruise Ships of 2016

A few cruise lines and ships dominate the superlatives in U.S. News & World Report’s latest annual rankings. The publication compared the top 15 cruise lines across several categories to determine the best options for 2016. The analysis is based on factors such as: Expert evaluations of ship quality Reputation among travelers Results from health... Read More

12 Ways to Slice Your Next Restaurant Bill

Personal Finance

12 Ways to Slice Your Next Restaurant Bill

12 Ways to Slice Your Next Restaurant Bill

Earlier this year, Americans started spending more money eating out than they spend on groceries. It was the first time that has happened since the U.S. Department of Commerce started collecting such data. By this summer, the price of a restaurant meal had jumped 3% compared with one year prior. But rising restaurant costs don’t mean you... Read More

When Is the Best Time to Buy Airline Tickets?

Personal Finance

When Is the Best Time to Buy Airline Tickets?

When Is the Best Time to Buy Airline Tickets?

Formulas for when to book a plane ticket at the best price seem to be an increasingly inexact science. Some theories are supported by data, but the Associated Press reports that trying to use a formula to book the best airline ticket price can also be like trying to time the stock market (which Money... Read More

8 Ways Organizing Your Fridge Can Save You Money

Personal Finance

8 Ways Organizing Your Fridge Can Save You Money

8 Ways Organizing Your Fridge Can Save You Money

How you arrange your refrigerator can affect how food tastes and how long it keeps. So investing a little time into organizing the fridge can spare you from losing money to spoiled food — and extra trips to the grocery store. Fortunately, implementing the following tips will cost you only a few minutes. 1. Keep Produce at Eye Level The... Read More

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