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Julia Eddington

In Auto Loans

Julia Eddington writes about the auto industry for Quoted, the content and news hub of The Zebra, a car insurance comparison company based in Austin, Texas.

11 Smart Ways to Reduce Your Travel Footprint

Personal Finance

11 Smart Ways to Reduce Your Travel Footprint

11 Smart Ways to Reduce Your Travel Footprint

As the high-travel summer season kicks off, we’d like to refocus on the environment, particularly ways we can make our travels a little greener. The United Nations designated 2017 as The International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development. Even more traditional travelers can make a positive difference to the environment during their adventures. A little... Read More

6 Reasons to Leave Your Car Insurance Company

Auto Loans

6 Reasons to Leave Your Car Insurance Company

6 Reasons to Leave Your Car Insurance Company

You might be familiar with a few scenarios that could make your auto insurance rates change: You bought a new car, moved, got in a car accident, or even got married or graduated from school. In all these cases, it’s important to shop around for car insurance to ensure you’re getting adequate coverage — at... Read More

Are Fast Cars More Expensive to Insure?

Auto Loans

Are Fast Cars More Expensive to Insure?

Are Fast Cars More Expensive to Insure?

Even just a decade ago, cars weren’t nearly as fast as they are today. In fact, 300 horsepower was expected only from V-8 engines, writes Forbes. But because of “direct fuel injection, turbocharging and other advances in engine technology and design, power and speed can be bought in a range of body styles, vehicle sizes... Read More

3 Simple Steps to Leasing a Car

Auto Loans

3 Simple Steps to Leasing a Car

3 Simple Steps to Leasing a Car

Shopping for a car is overwhelming. Not only must we choose between new or used, decide on a make and model, and sort through safety features and trim packages, but then we need to decide how to pay for it. If you’ve got the cash to pay for your car in full up front, it... Read More

A Quick Guide to How Much Car You Can Really Afford

Auto Loans

A Quick Guide to How Much Car You Can Really Afford

A Quick Guide to How Much Car You Can Really Afford

If you’re planning a car purchase, and even if you’re in the middle of financing your car, a few tips from financial experts can help you save money (and hopefully guard against becoming “underwater” on your loan). Paying off a car is, of course, a highly individual process dependent on many different personal factors like... Read More

You Just Paid Off Your Car — Now What?

Personal Finance

You Just Paid Off Your Car — Now What?

You Just Paid Off Your Car — Now What?

Making the last payment on a car loan is a great accomplishment and, for most of us, a welcome relief. But with the end of that era comes another: life as the owner of a car – “free and clear.” Most people finance their vehicle for five years, said banker Deric Poldberg from American National... Read More

6 Speeding Ticket Myths Debunked

Personal Finance

6 Speeding Ticket Myths Debunked

6 Speeding Ticket Myths Debunked

Speeding tickets: the source of stress and financial setbacks (fines, points, insurance increases), occasional bragging rights (ever gotten out of a speeding ticket… as the passenger?) and enduring myths. Here, we suss out the truth around some common speeding ticket assertions. 1. You Can’t Successfully Fight a Speeding Ticket in Court Verdict: False We’re not... Read More

7 Things You Never Knew Impacted Your Car Insurance

Personal Finance

7 Things You Never Knew Impacted Your Car Insurance

7 Things You Never Knew Impacted Your Car Insurance

When searching for an auto insurance policy, there are things we expect will impact our rates: demographic details like age, home address, even credit score. But in the world of car insurance, there are still surprises, believe it or not. Below, you’ll find the top seven most surprising things that can impact your car insurance rates,... Read More

5 Things to Do After a Hit-and-Run

Personal Finance

5 Things to Do After a Hit-and-Run

5 Things to Do After a Hit-and-Run

Some traffic incidents cause heart pounding reactions, like stolen cars, car crashes, and near-misses. Unsurprisingly, hit-and-runs can be one of the most upsetting. When a driver hits a pedestrian, property or another car, or causes a collision, and then either flees the scene or doesn’t provide truthful information, it’s a hit-and-run. In these scenarios, information... Read More

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