5 Frugal Ways to Fight the Flu

Personal Finance

5 Frugal Ways to Fight the Flu

5 Frugal Ways to Fight the Flu

It’s well-nigh impossible for the average person to avoid the influenza virus. You have no idea who touched that doorknob or keyboard before you did, and one person coughing on the subway could make you mighty uncomfortable over the next week or two. Worse, you could unwittingly transmit this potentially devastating disease to those you... Read More

8 Tips for a Financially Sane Vacation

Personal Finance

8 Tips for a Financially Sane Vacation

8 Tips for a Financially Sane Vacation

Have you taken your summer vacation yet? Or has your vacation taken you? Some people travel on autopilot. You cart the kids off to Disneyland because you’re supposed to? Or, you fly to Europe because everyone says you should see Paris before you die. But what do you want? “Most of us don’t take the time to think about what would... Read More

Hate Your Roommate? 48 Ways to Afford Living Solo

Personal Finance

Hate Your Roommate? 48 Ways to Afford Living Solo

Hate Your Roommate? 48 Ways to Afford Living Solo

No roommate no cry, right? It might be a relief to quit sharing space, whether that means you are just out of the college dormitory or exiting some other co-living situation. But living alone (getting the bathroom all to yourself!) does come at a huge premium, according to U.S. News & World Report. Looked at the other... Read More

14 Free Ways to Redecorate Your Home

Personal Finance

14 Free Ways to Redecorate Your Home

14 Free Ways to Redecorate Your Home

Sometimes our homes make us feel tired. As in weary of: Rooms that have looked the same since 2007. Kid- or pet-raddled furniture. Wending our way through — and cleaning — crowded spaces Dark paint, insufficient lighting, cluttered shelves or anything else that keeps us from loving where we live. Maybe you fret over finding the... Read More

4 Essential Money Moves to Make in Your 40s

Personal Finance

4 Essential Money Moves to Make in Your 40s

4 Essential Money Moves to Make in Your 40s

For many people, hitting the big 4-0 can actually be quite freeing. You’re in your peak earning years, and your home is likely close to being paid off. The kids are out of that house — or nearly so — and you’re enjoying more of the other things life has to offer: hobbies, travel, restaurants... Read More

How to Adjust Your Budget When Your Income Drops Off

Personal Finance

How to Adjust Your Budget When Your Income Drops Off

How to Adjust Your Budget When Your Income Drops Off

Suppose the first thing your boss says tomorrow is, “Sorry, but I’m cutting you back to 28 hours a week.” How long before you couldn’t pay your bills? Sometimes bad stuff happens to good workers. No one wants to think about a major income drop, but getting ready now means that you won’t be quite... Read More

Can’t Seem to Save? You’re Not Following These Simple Rules

Personal Finance

Can’t Seem to Save? You’re Not Following These Simple Rules

Can’t Seem to Save? You’re Not Following These Simple Rules

How’s your bank balance? It should be healthier than this time last year. And if it isn’t? Only a few explanations exist for this lack of progress: The past 12 months were filled with budget busters such as car trouble, medical co-pays and the need to replace major appliances. You were already living paycheck to... Read More

8 Secrets to Making a Budget You Can Actually Live With

Personal Finance

8 Secrets to Making a Budget You Can Actually Live With

8 Secrets to Making a Budget You Can Actually Live With

Some people refer to budgets as a “money diet.” That’s an unfortunate choice of words given the negative connotations associated with dieting: reduced options, deprivation, maybe even pain. That’s not to say that diets aren’t important. And just as with budgeting, you feel optimistic: I will eat better, exercise more, lose weight and be able to... Read More

11 Hidden Perks at Your Local Pharmacy

Personal Finance

11 Hidden Perks at Your Local Pharmacy

11 Hidden Perks at Your Local Pharmacy

Think pharmacies are only about antibiotics and condoms? Think again. You can get vaccinations, blood pressure readings, specially packaged medications and many other perks. In some cities you can even see a doctor in the drugstore. How convenient is that if it turns out you need a prescription? Here’s an all-too-typical scenario: Your child wakes... Read More

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