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Christine Giordano

Reporter & Editor |  In Credit Score, Managing Debt

Christine Giordano is an editor and reporter for Credit.com who covers a variety of personal finance topics. Prior to joining us, Christine wrote for The New York Times, U.S. News & World Report, Harper’s Bazaar, Newsday and many other publications. A former staff writer for the New York Times Company, she is an award-winning journalist. You can follow her on Twitter @chrisgiordano.

Debate Recap: What the Heck Is Carried Interest?

Personal Finance

Debate Recap: What the Heck Is Carried Interest?

Debate Recap: What the Heck Is Carried Interest?

Eliminating “carried interest” was something that came up a few times during Sunday night’s debate between presidential candidates Donald Trump and Secretary Hillary Clinton. When Trump was asked what specific tax provisions he would change to ensure the wealthiest Americans pay their fair share in taxes, he responded that he’d get rid of carried interest,... Read More

5 Habits of Successful Savers

Personal Finance

5 Habits of Successful Savers

5 Habits of Successful Savers

There are some people who are expert savers. They seem to always have enough money for that rainy day. But putting cash aside remains a challenge for many of us, even though we all know that calamities happen – puppies get sick, jobs get lost, hurricanes damage homes. And maybe, just maybe, we’d like to... Read More

12 Things Insurance Might Not Cover After Hurricane Matthew

Personal Finance

12 Things Insurance Might Not Cover After Hurricane Matthew

12 Things Insurance Might Not Cover After Hurricane Matthew

If you’ve been hit by Hurricane Matthew, you’re probably taking inventory of the damages. If you’re not in a high-risk area, your homeowner’s policy will most likely cover most of the damage caused by the hurricane’s relentless gusts. Most policies cover damage from rain, wind, hail, lightning and other storm-related elements. Even damages caused by... Read More

Can Debts Just Magically Disappear From Your Credit Report?

Managing Debt

Can Debts Just Magically Disappear From Your Credit Report?

Can Debts Just Magically Disappear From Your Credit Report?

Sometimes when you check your credit report, there can be some unpleasant surprises waiting for you — a bill you never knew about or an account that’s not yours. But other times, you may find a debt that you’ve known has been hurting your credit for a while has just magically disappeared. Perhaps it’s a... Read More

Can I Get Last-Minute Insurance for Hurricane Matthew?

Personal Finance

Can I Get Last-Minute Insurance for Hurricane Matthew?

Can I Get Last-Minute Insurance for Hurricane Matthew?

For homeowners in the path of Hurricane Matthew who are uninsured or underinsured, it’s probably too late to get or add coverage. That’s because insurance companies generally stop writing coverage as soon as an area is under a hurricane warning. In most cases, however, if you have homeowner’s insurance, you have coverage for wind, unless... Read More

This Tool Helps You Find a Place to Live Based on Your Budget

Personal Finance

This Tool Helps You Find a Place to Live Based on Your Budget

This Tool Helps You Find a Place to Live Based on Your Budget

If you’re wondering where you can happily live on a shoestring, retire on a budget, or, maybe, where you can step up your lifestyle and live in the lap of luxury within your budget, the new website, theearthawaits.com, has a tool to help you find your own unique nirvana. With multiple-choice menus and slider tools, you... Read More

Help! Someone Keeps Giving My Phone Number to Debt Collectors

Personal Finance

Help! Someone Keeps Giving My Phone Number to Debt Collectors

Help! Someone Keeps Giving My Phone Number to Debt Collectors

Sometimes, your phone number gets associated with a loan you’ve never applied for. We can never be sure why it happens: Perhaps it was the debtor’s phone number before it was yours, or they invented what they thought was a fake number because they don’t own a phone, or maybe they’re just trying to hide... Read More

Here’s Where the Rich Are Donating Their Money

Personal Finance

Here’s Where the Rich Are Donating Their Money

Here’s Where the Rich Are Donating Their Money

Some charities or causes seem to get more financial attention than others in terms of where wealthy people donate their money. And now we have a bit more insight into where that is, thanks to this sneak peek of an extensive report from the U.S. Trust and the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy called... Read More

Uber Is Partnering with … Sears?

Personal Finance

Uber Is Partnering with … Sears?

Uber Is Partnering with … Sears?

[Update: Some offers mentioned below have expired. For current terms and conditions, please see card agreements. Disclosure: Cards from our partners are mentioned below.] Now if you take a ride with Uber in New York City or Chicago, a new partnership with Sears can allow you to earn shopping cash for its stores or Shop Your Way rewards website, the... Read More

Wells Fargo Execs to Give Back Some of Their Millions Following Fake Account Scandal

Personal Finance

Wells Fargo Execs to Give Back Some of Their Millions Following Fake Account Scandal

Wells Fargo Execs to Give Back Some of Their Millions Following Fake Account Scandal

The Wells Fargo sales scandal will cost chairman and chief executive John Stumpf $41 million and former community banking supervisor Carrie Tolstedt $19 million, as per a decision made by the bank’s board that was announced on Tuesday. The money will come from the executives’ unvested equity awards through a clawback process. For Stumpf, the $41... Read More

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