16 Tips to a Successful Yard Sale

Personal Finance

16 Tips to a Successful Yard Sale

16 Tips to a Successful Yard Sale

It’s an American classic: the yard sale. Or tag sale, garage sale, attic sale, porch sale, barn sale, junk sale, moving sale, and the ever-popular rummage sale. Sharing your household excess with others while making a pocketful of change is a tradition that’s been around for as long as people have been collecting clutter. But don’t make... Read More

8 Tips to Stop Annoying Robocalls

Personal Finance

8 Tips to Stop Annoying Robocalls

8 Tips to Stop Annoying Robocalls

Automated calls are becoming more frequent and more infuriating. Weren’t they supposed to have been banned? Yes, but that hasn’t happened in practice. According to the Better Business Bureau, the federal Telemarketing Sales Rule prohibits recorded sales messages unless you have given written permission for the caller to contact you, regardless of whether or not your number is on... Read More

Why You Need to Make a Home Inventory Right Now

Personal Finance

Why You Need to Make a Home Inventory Right Now

Why You Need to Make a Home Inventory Right Now

Hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, floods, fires: Disaster strikes all the time. But until it hits close to home — literally — most people assume it could never happen to them. Unless You Have a Photographic Memory … Sure, most of us have insurance. But how many have a full home inventory? Without one, if you lose it all,... Read More

How to Avoid 8 Seriously Foolish Financial Mistakes

Personal Finance

How to Avoid 8 Seriously Foolish Financial Mistakes

How to Avoid 8 Seriously Foolish Financial Mistakes

Everybody makes mistakes. But while nobody’s perfect, there’s no reason to waste hundreds or even thousands of dollars on financial moves that are proven folly. Here are eight common financial fouls you can avoid. 1. Borrowing to Buy Depreciating Assets Problem: Your IOU becomes an OMG when your purchase loses value. That’s why the housing crisis was... Read More

10 Ways to Cut the Cost of Self-Storage

Personal Finance

10 Ways to Cut the Cost of Self-Storage

10 Ways to Cut the Cost of Self-Storage

Americans buy — and keep — a lot of stuff. That’s made self-storage a $24 billion industry, according to its major trade group, the Self Storage Association. According to the SSA, 84% of all U.S. counties have at least one self-storage facility. It’s been one of the fastest-growing sectors of the commercial real estate industry for the past... Read More

10 Things to Know Before You Book a Cruise

Personal Finance

10 Things to Know Before You Book a Cruise

10 Things to Know Before You Book a Cruise

More than 20 million people will go on cruises this year, spending an average of $1,779 per passenger per week, according to Cruise Market Watch. The advantages people find in this type of travel include the opportunity to explore multiple destinations without checking in and out of hotels, having amenities and entertainment all in one place, and the chance... Read More

You Can Finally Keep Some of Your Leftover FSA Money

Personal Finance

You Can Finally Keep Some of Your Leftover FSA Money

You Can Finally Keep Some of Your Leftover FSA Money

After 30 years, the Treasury Department is losing its “use it or lose it” policy regarding health flexible spending accounts. “To make health FSAs more consumer-friendly and provide added flexibility, the updated guidance permits employers to allow plan participants to carry over up to $500 of their unused health FSA balances remaining at the end of... Read More

Study: With Age Comes Financial Wisdom

Personal Finance

Study: With Age Comes Financial Wisdom

Study: With Age Comes Financial Wisdom

Do we get wiser as we age, or do our mental abilities decline? The answer is probably both, new research says. Researchers from the University of California, Riverside, and Columbia University tested the decision-making skills and intelligence of 336 participants for a study published in Psychology and Aging. There were 173 participants between ages 18 and 29, and 163 between 60... Read More

Study: College Students Worry About Debt, Not Overdrafts

Students

Study: College Students Worry About Debt, Not Overdrafts

Study: College Students Worry About Debt, Not Overdrafts

College students need more than Credit 101 — they need schools with holistic financial literacy programs. That’s the message of a new study by EverFi. It says reactionary help, such as default management or loan exit counseling, isn’t as good as teaching students money management all along. “A freshman in college may benefit most from education around school loans, budgeting... Read More

More Americans Will Pay Federal Income Tax This Year

Personal Finance

More Americans Will Pay Federal Income Tax This Year

More Americans Will Pay Federal Income Tax This Year

The number of U.S. households that pay federal income taxes is rising, the Tax Policy Center rel=”nofollow” says. The center credits a better economy and the expiration of some tax cuts. About 57% of households will pay federal income taxes for 2013, it estimates. In 2009, that figure was 53%. That doesn’t mean those who will pay no federal income tax are tax-free.... Read More

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