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Bob Sullivan

Contributor |  In Personal Finance, Identity Theft

Bob Sullivan is author of the New York Times best-sellers Gotcha Capitalism and Stop Getting Ripped Off. His stories have appeared in The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and hundreds of other publications. He has appeared as a consumer advocate and technology expert numerous times on NBC’s TODAY show, NBC Nightly News, CNBC, NPR’s Marketplace, Terry Gross’ Fresh Air, and various other radio and TV outlets. He helped start MSNBC.com and wrote there for nearly 20 years, most of it penning the consumer advocacy column The Red Tape Chronicles. See more at www.bobsullivan.net. Follow Bob Sullivan on Facebook or Twitter.

The Fed Just Teased a Rate Hike. Will Savings Rates Finally Improve?

Personal Finance

The Fed Just Teased a Rate Hike. Will Savings Rates Finally Improve?

The Fed Just Teased a Rate Hike. Will Savings Rates Finally Improve?

[Update: Some offers mentioned below have expired. For current terms and conditions, please see product agreements. Disclosure: Products from our partners are mentioned below.] Interest rates are likely going up again, and soon, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen told Congress Tuesday, sending up a clear flare for anyone paying attention. “Waiting too long … would be unwise,” she... Read More

CFPB Sues Firm for Allegedly Scamming 9/11 First Responders

Personal Finance

CFPB Sues Firm for Allegedly Scamming 9/11 First Responders

CFPB Sues Firm for Allegedly Scamming 9/11 First Responders

A firm accused of scamming 9/11 first responders and former NFL players into giving them large chunks of their compensation funds via costly advance payment deals has been sued by federal and state authorities. RD Legal Funding, based in Cresskill, New Jersey, was sued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the New York State Attorney General’s... Read More

How to Protect Your Money Under Trump’s Financial Regulation Changes

Personal Finance

How to Protect Your Money Under Trump’s Financial Regulation Changes

How to Protect Your Money Under Trump’s Financial Regulation Changes

An executive memorandum signed by President Donald Trump on Feb. 3 is aimed at consumers’ retirement accounts and will impact a majority of Americans almost immediately. The memo might delay, potentially forever, the so-called “fiduciary rule” that would have legally bound financial advisers to give retirement savers the best advice possible. Critics lashed out, claiming the... Read More

Identity Theft Hit an All-Time High in 2016

Identity Theft

Identity Theft Hit an All-Time High in 2016

Identity Theft Hit an All-Time High in 2016

Despite years of battling by the financial industry and a massive change in the way Americans use debit and credit cards, the rate of identity theft soared during 2016, a new report has found. In fact, it hit an all-time high. An estimated 15.4 million consumers were hit with some kind of ID theft last... Read More

Will a Trump Presidency Lead to More Predatory Lending?

Personal Finance

Will a Trump Presidency Lead to More Predatory Lending?

Will a Trump Presidency Lead to More Predatory Lending?

Free markets mean corporations and consumers are engaged in a constant arm-wrestling match over prices and rules governing marketplaces. When President-elect Donald Trump takes office, will the rules of this engagement change substantially? Already, Republicans are fighting hard to dismantle, or at least disempower, the nation’s newest federal consumer protection agency, the Consumer Financial Protection... Read More

Why Aren’t Americans Moving Anymore?

Mortgages

Why Aren’t Americans Moving Anymore?

Why Aren’t Americans Moving Anymore?

January is a good time to take stock of your career, and with the economy perking up, perhaps you should to consider making a dramatic change. After all, what’s more American than relocating for opportunity? But even as careers get shorter — the average millennial will have seven jobs by age 28 — and the... Read More

How Millennials Are Changing the Grocery Store

Personal Finance

How Millennials Are Changing the Grocery Store

How Millennials Are Changing the Grocery Store

Next time you run to the grocery store for bread and milk, you might find yourself staying for a champagne tasting. Or seduced by Comice Pears. Or perhaps you’ll just stay home and cook the elicoidali pasta and mascarpone cheese from your Blue Apron box. The digital age has changed how we shop for everything, and now food is... Read More

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