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Adam Levin

Co-Founder, Credit.com |  In Identity Theft, Personal Finance

Adam Levin is co-founder of Credit.com and the chairman and founder of CyberScout (formerly IDT911). His experience as former director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs gives him unique insight into consumer privacy, legislation and financial advocacy. He is a nationally recognized expert on identity theft and credit, and is the author of SWIPED: How to Protect Yourself in a World Full of Scammers, Phishers, and Identity Thieves, a practical, lively book that is essential to surviving the ever-changing world of online security.

5 Scary Wedding Scams to Avoid This Season

Identity Theft

5 Scary Wedding Scams to Avoid This Season

5 Scary Wedding Scams to Avoid This Season

Weddings require many important decisions and the wrong call can mean the difference between an unforgettable wonderful day and a day that makes you angry every time you think about it. The often unreasonably high expectations of families and friends and at least one spouse-to-be only makes matters more fraught. With such a high level... Read More

6 Summer Scams & How to Avoid Them

Identity Theft

6 Summer Scams & How to Avoid Them

6 Summer Scams & How to Avoid Them

As the weather gets warmer, mosquitos and ticks re-enter our lives, and along with them comes their larger cousin, the scam artist. There are ways to prepare for those seasonal meal stealers. The same goes for scams, as foreknowledge is the best repellent. Ticks and mosquitos aren’t harmless — they are well-known vectors for serious... Read More

Are You Hack-Proof? Here’s How to Make Sure

Identity Theft

Are You Hack-Proof? Here’s How to Make Sure

Are You Hack-Proof? Here’s How to Make Sure

While the writing has been on the wall for a long time, last Friday it was in the news wires when a new strain of ransomware called WannaCrypt raged like an out-of-control wildfire across Europe and Asia, ultimately impacting computers in 150 countries. For many affected by this hack, a few hundred dollars in ransom... Read More

4 Mother’s Day Scams You Want to Avoid

Identity Theft

4 Mother’s Day Scams You Want to Avoid

4 Mother’s Day Scams You Want to Avoid

Did you know that with the exception of Christmas, people spend more money on Mother’s Day than any other holiday? The forecast for 2017 is $23.6 billion, and if you think scammers aren’t on the job, there’s a new marshmallow bridge spanning Loon Lake I’d to sell you a piece of. In order, the most-gifted... Read More

5 Tricks to Make Your Identity Portfolio More Secure

Identity Theft

5 Tricks to Make Your Identity Portfolio More Secure

5 Tricks to Make Your Identity Portfolio More Secure

I’ve written extensively about the importance of building a credit portfolio. Credit equals buying power, which, when used wisely, can lead to increased net worth. Put simply, bad credit means fewer consumer choices and a staggering number of lost opportunities in the way of deals, car-factory incentives and other credit-based transactions. No matter the purchase... Read More

Is It Time to Buy a Biometric Scanner?

Identity Theft

Is It Time to Buy a Biometric Scanner?

Is It Time to Buy a Biometric Scanner?

Identity theft is still out there, keeping pace with the latest innovations and security measures, and snaring new victims every day. With the advent of cheaper, standalone, easy-to-integrate biometric technology for authentication, is it time to buy a fingerprint scanner? What’s a Biometric Scanner? Biometric technology uses physical or biological information, like a fingerprint, retinal... Read More

Why Tax Collection Scams Are Getting Harder to Stop

Personal Finance

Why Tax Collection Scams Are Getting Harder to Stop

Why Tax Collection Scams Are Getting Harder to Stop

I’ve written about tax-related crime for years, and have always offered this fail-safe rule to avoid tax scams: If you ever receive a call from the IRS about back taxes or any other money you supposedly owe the government, hang up because it’s a scam. There was something comforting about that advice — maybe even... Read More

6 Easter Scams You Want to Avoid

Identity Theft

6 Easter Scams You Want to Avoid

6 Easter Scams You Want to Avoid

Easter is a time for family, colorful parties and egg hunts, but sadly it also attracts scam artists looking to make a quick buck during the high-fructose corn syrup free-for-all. There are all stripes of Eastertime cons and scams waiting for you if you’re not paying attention — or even if you are. Some don’t... Read More

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