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Adam Levin

Co-Founder, Credit.com |  In Identity Theft, Personal Finance

Adam Levin is co-founder of Credit.com and the chairman and founder of CyberScout. His experience as former director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs gives him unique insight into consumer privacy, legislation and financial advocacy. He is a nationally recognized expert on identity theft and credit, and is the author of SWIPED: How to Protect Yourself in a World Full of Scammers, Phishers, and Identity Thieves, a practical, lively book that is essential to surviving the ever-changing world of online security.

Should We Kill the Social Security Number?

Uncategorized

Should We Kill the Social Security Number?

Should We Kill the Social Security Number?

While tax season is still producing eye twitches around the nation, it’s time to face the music about tax-related identity theft. Experts project the 2014 tax year will be a bad one. The Anthem breach alone exposed 80 million Social Security numbers, and then was quickly followed by the Premera breach that exposed yet another... Read More

Last-Minute Tax Filers: Beware of This Obamacare Scam

Identity Theft

Last-Minute Tax Filers: Beware of This Obamacare Scam

Last-Minute Tax Filers: Beware of This Obamacare Scam

For all stripe of rip-off artist, tax season might as well be called open season. Scams are legion, and navigating a solution after the fact can be somewhere between maddening and negotiating an Iran deal that everyone likes. Last month the IRS issued a warning that received scant attention from the media, but nonetheless could... Read More

It Took Just One Email to Compromise the Leaders of the Free World

News

It Took Just One Email to Compromise the Leaders of the Free World

It Took Just One Email to Compromise the Leaders of the Free World

Whether an autofill mishap or a “What in the name of God were you thinking?” move, somebody’s shrimp is on the barbie at Australia’s immigration department after an officer there emailed President Obama’s passport number and other personal information to an organizer at the Asian Cup football tournament. And before you think otherwise: Yeah, it... Read More

The New Grave Robbers: Identity Thieves

Identity Theft

The New Grave Robbers: Identity Thieves

The New Grave Robbers: Identity Thieves

Take your driver’s license out of your wallet. Flip it over. Now look carefully at the back of it. There’s no box to check for “Identity Donor.” Yet when it comes to identity-related crimes, one of the greatest times of vulnerability is immediately after you die. You can do everything right. You can use long... Read More

Should the Secret Service Protect Candidates Online?

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Should the Secret Service Protect Candidates Online?

Should the Secret Service Protect Candidates Online?

The Democratic and Republican gristmills got to work last week on Hillary Clinton’s “homebrew” email, and the ensuing firestorm underscored an alarming lack of cyber-savvy among the leading players of the 2016 election. It also raised a serious question: Should the Secret Service protect presidential candidates from cyberattacks? News of Hillary Clinton’s use of a... Read More

The Solution to Tax ID Theft Is an Unpopular One: Slower Refunds

News

The Solution to Tax ID Theft Is an Unpopular One: Slower Refunds

The Solution to Tax ID Theft Is an Unpopular One: Slower Refunds

The Government Accountability Office estimates that $5.8 billion was lost to identity thieves filing fraudulent tax returns in 2013 and that there may have been as much as $24.2 billion in thwarted attempts. Tax refund fraud losses are estimated to reach $21 billion by 2016, according to the Treasury Inspector General Tax Administration. While the... Read More

Was the Billion-Dollar Bank Heist Preventable?

News

Was the Billion-Dollar Bank Heist Preventable?

Was the Billion-Dollar Bank Heist Preventable?

A funny thing happened on the way to the ATM (and depending on who you believe, may still be happening). Scratch that. For the lucky few at the right place at the right time, an awesome thing has been happening: ATMs randomly coughing up cash—and a lot of it.  Like an international lottery, the phenomenon... Read More

Who’s to Blame for Identity Theft? Everyone

Identity Theft

Who’s to Blame for Identity Theft? Everyone

Who’s to Blame for Identity Theft? Everyone

The other day a reporter asked me who’s to blame for the growing epidemic of identity-related tax fraud. I almost replied, “the government and the bad guys,” but I caught myself before committing to that inaccuracy. “We’re all to blame,” I said. I believe that breaches, and the identity theft that flows from them, have... Read More

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