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Adam Levin

Co-Founder, Credit.com |  In Identity Theft, Personal Finance

Adam Levin is co-founder of Credit.com and the chairman and founder of CyberScout. His experience as former director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs gives him unique insight into consumer privacy, legislation and financial advocacy. He is a nationally recognized expert on identity theft and credit, and is the author of SWIPED: How to Protect Yourself in a World Full of Scammers, Phishers, and Identity Thieves, a practical, lively book that is essential to surviving the ever-changing world of online security.

Identity Theft and the New Tax Bill

Personal Finance

Identity Theft and the New Tax Bill

Identity Theft and the New Tax Bill

The 2017 filing season could be the worst yet for tax-related crime. With widespread confusion about the new tax law, IRS budget cuts, and a record-breaking year for data compromises, there’s an opening for fraud that should be serious cause for alarm, but doesn’t seem to be. The bottom line: you should be concerned. Last... Read More

6 Ways to Make Your Family Harder to Hack 2018

Identity Theft

6 Ways to Make Your Family Harder to Hack 2018

6 Ways to Make Your Family Harder to Hack 2018

While there are a thousand resolution-worthy action items out there, the time is always now for the things that need to change in our lives. Never were truer words spoken when it comes to our potential vulnerability to hackers. The number of breaches and the granular nature of the data exposed in those attacks over... Read More

The 12 Scams of Christmas for 2017

Identity Theft

The 12 Scams of Christmas for 2017

The 12 Scams of Christmas for 2017

Scammers make a killing during the holiday season. While you spend your time thinking of ways to bring holiday joy to others, they spend their time thinking up ways to steal from you. The saddest part about this is that the ghosts of Christmases past keep visiting Christmas present. With that, I give you this... Read More

How the Uber Hack Could Get You Robbed This Christmas (Again)

Identity Theft

How the Uber Hack Could Get You Robbed This Christmas (Again)

How the Uber Hack Could Get You Robbed This Christmas (Again)

News that Uber got hacked and 57 million records were compromised may not seem like an overt threat after this year’s constant mega breaches—but it is. A recent study suggests that even something as “harmless” as a breach involving names, phone numbers, and email addresses can lead to account takeover. The study, entitled “Data Breaches,... Read More

Can You Hack-Proof Your Personal Email Address?

Identity Theft

Can You Hack-Proof Your Personal Email Address?

Can You Hack-Proof Your Personal Email Address?

How would you feel if the digital “you” were deleted? The common wisdom in cybersecurity circles is that if you think it can’t happen to you, it probably will. Consider Mat Honan’s story. “First my Google account was taken over, then deleted,” Honan wrote. “Next my Twitter account was compromised, and used as a platform... Read More

5 Ways to Keep Your Personal Health Information Safe

Identity Theft

5 Ways to Keep Your Personal Health Information Safe

5 Ways to Keep Your Personal Health Information Safe

Did members of the royal family go under the knife at an upscale London plastic surgery clinic? A recent hack at London Bridge Plastic Surgery may reveal the answer to that—and many other questions you never thought to ask. Setting aside the obvious follow-up questions (Do you care? Is it any of your business?) and... Read More

Why Spam Is More Dangerous Than Ever

Identity Theft

Why Spam Is More Dangerous Than Ever

Why Spam Is More Dangerous Than Ever

Spam is supposed to be a thing of the past, but it’s not—and today it comes weaponized with manifold data-grabbing threats—from ransomware to keystroke recorders and beyond. Your email has never been more dangerous. There was a time in the early 2000s when email spam and malicious botnets were viewed as mere nuisances. A confident... Read More

Are Your Connected Devices Safe?

Identity Theft

Are Your Connected Devices Safe?

Are Your Connected Devices Safe?

The number of Internet of Things (IoT) devices in use is forecasted to hit 8.4 billion this year. That’s more than the human population on planet Earth. And with successful attacks like Mirai (which was the malware used in the 2016 Dyn cyberattack) already a part of the IoT story, there’s plenty to worry about.... Read More

Post Equifax: Will Free Credit Freezes Help?

Identity Theft

Post Equifax: Will Free Credit Freezes Help?

Post Equifax: Will Free Credit Freezes Help?

When Equifax announced the historic data compromise that exposed the sensitive personal information of up to 143 million consumers, the company said victims would have access to credit freezes for a month free of charge. This was not exactly a solution to the fresh hell it had just announced. Frankly, it seemed like a relatively... Read More

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Certain credit cards and other financial products mentioned in this and other sponsored content on Credit.com are Partners with Credit.com. Credit.com receives compensation if our users apply for and ultimately sign up for any financial products or cards offered.

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Thanks for checking out Credit.com. We hope you find the site and the journalism we produce useful. We wanted to take some time to tell you a bit about ourselves.

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The Credit.com editorial team is staffed by a team of editors and reporters, each with many years of financial reporting experience. We’ve worked for places like the New York Times, American Banker, Frontline, TheStreet.com, Business Insider, ABC News, NBC News, CNBC and many others. We also employ a few freelancers and more than 50 contributors (these are typically subject matter experts from the worlds of finance, academia, politics, business and elsewhere).

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The Credit.com editorial team is committed to providing our readers and viewers with sound, well-reported and understandable information designed to inform and empower. We won’t tell you what to do. We will, however, do our best to explain the consequences of various actions, thereby arming you with the information you need to make decisions that are in your best interests. We also write about things relating to money and finance we think are interesting and want to share.

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Credit.com’s journalism is largely supported by an e-commerce business model. Rather than rely on revenue from display ad impressions, Credit.com maintains a financial marketplace separate from its editorial pages. When someone navigates to those pages, and applies for a credit card, for example, Credit.com will get paid what is essentially a finder’s fee if that person ends up getting the card. That doesn’t mean, however, that our editorial decisions are informed by the products available in our marketplace. The editorial team chooses what to write about and how to write about it independently of the decisions and priorities of the business side of the company. In fact, we maintain a strict and important firewall between the editorial and business departments. Our mission as journalists is to serve the reader, not the advertiser. In that sense, we are no different from any other news organization that is supported by ad revenue.

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- The Credit.com Editorial Team