Home > Personal Finance > 8 Ridiculously Expensive Hotel Spa Treatments

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Massages and body treatments are considered the ultimate luxury, and for good reason: They don’t come cheap. The average hour-long massage can set you back a good $60 while body treatments can cost even more. Book your appointment at a high-end hotel like the Bulgari in London, and you could easily spend a weekend draining your savings account.

Check out some of the most ridiculously expensive hotel spa treatments around the world:

Bulgari Hotel London Spa

Service: Radio Frequency (Skin Tightening)

Cost: Course of six treatments for €1,250 or approximately US$1,326

This non-invasive cosmetic treatment is geared toward those freaked out about cellulite and other worrisome signs of aging. The idea is to “tighten and rejuvenate the skin” while promoting production of collagen, that structural protein that makes skin look so youthful. An Alma HD3D RF machine delivers focused RF energy to each layer of skin; the spa brochure says you’ll notice results after one session.

Granite Spa at The Ranch at Rock Creek, Philipsburg, Montana

Service: 150-minute Rock Creek Ritual 

Cost: $480

Renew your skin with a 60-minute Bulletproof Coffee Detox Wrap, followed by “an invigorating exfoliation.” From there, you’ll be wrapped in a hot towel and given a face and scalp massage. Hand-picked essential oils and Swedish massage are designed to make you feel as “fluid as Rock Creek.” The “cheaper” 120-minute version costs $400.

Kahaia Spa at Four Seasons Bora Bora Resort

Service: Kahaia Spa Suite Package

Cost: 100,500 French Pacific Francs or approximately US$891

With this package, couples receive access to their own outdoor terrace, a soaking bath, drench shower and relaxation area — and that’s all prior to the actual services. Slip behind close doors and you’ll be led to two treatment beds with wide-open views of the water below. Any combination of treatments and rituals may be chosen.

Napa Spa at Auberge Du Soleil, Napa Valley

Service: Ultimate Indulgence Afterhours

Cost: $2,500

Couples feeling frisky between the hours of 8 and 11 p.m. may want to spring for this package, which offers exclusive use of the spa, massage and bath, plus wine and dessert.

Post Ranch Spa, Big Sur 

Service: Fire Ceremony

Cost: $595

Take your main squeeze to a “safe, sacred space established by the medicine wheel,” says the Post Ranch brochure. There you’ll experience an indigenous fire ceremony of purification or transformation, depending on where you’re at in your life. “Your shaman guides an interactive journey, drawing the energy of the fire to focus attention on an opening for healing distinctive patterns.”

Spa at Trump Chicago

Service: Balancing Diamonds Massage

Cost: $300 to $315

Promising “clarity, inspiration and enlightenment,” this POTUS-approved massage slathers you with oils “infused with the healing benefits of precious diamonds and botanical essences.” If diamonds aren’t your thing, they also offer Purifying Emeralds, Revitalizing Rubies and Calming Sapphires editions.

The Spa at Chedi Andermatt, Switzerland

Treatment: The Chedi Oriental Ritual

Cost: 750 Swiss Francs or approximately US$742

You get what you pay for at this Swiss retreat: aromatherapy foot polish, The Chedi Jade massage, REN facial, Thai-style foot reflexology, Himalayan crystal body polish and an Oriental bathing ceremony.

Qua Spa at Caesar’s Palace, Las Vegas

Service: 180-minute Signature Hourglass Treatment

Cost: $650

Got three hours and $650 to spare? If so, this personalized treatment may be just what you’re after. Combining hot stones, aromatherapy, chakra balancing and energy work, you’ll feel brand new when the session is over. Or not — this is Vegas, after all. Be sure to check out the Arctic Ice Room, where crystals made from soap and water drip from ceiling vents with the goal of reducing hypertension and tightening pores.

Save on Your Next Getaway

If hitting the spa is on your agenda, do your wallet a favor and at least try to save on hotels, airfare or checked luggage. One way to do that: travel rewards cards. These bad boys can help you save on all of the above and rack up some freebies to boot. You can check out our roundup of the best airline miles cards here or read our take on how to choose the best rewards card for you.

Remember, before you apply for any credit card, it’s wise to check your credit to see if you’ll qualify. You can do that right here on Credit.com, where you’ll get two of your free credit scores with helpful updates every two weeks. Checking your credit scores won’t hurt them one bit and is a great way to manage your finances.

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