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Chances are, if you ask a business owner or other entrepreneur what apps they rely on to help them stay on top of things you’ll get a response like this: “Apps? I don’t know. I’m too busy running a business to worry about apps” or “Hahahahaha! I’m not on top of things!”

Those are real responses from some highly entrepreneurial business owners to whom I posed the question. And, when you stop and think about it, their responses make sense. After all, most entrepreneurs aren’t going to mention that cup of coffee, their email or their phone as essentials to their daily work because they’re just so much a part of their day-to-day. Like oxygen or sunlight, you only really think about them when they’re suddenly unavailable.

The same holds true for genuinely helpful apps. They become fully ingrained into the user’s daily work and even personal lives. We looked across the spectrum at apps that help users communicate, organize their days, be more productive, keep their data and communications secure, and even help them learn.

The following are seven apps we think can truly help entrepreneurs focus more attention on running their business and less on the tools they’re using to do it.

1. KanbanFlow by CodeKick AB

Platforms: Android and iOS

Price: Free Basic version, $5/user/month Premium version

If you need to manage projects, KanbanFlow can help you do it. This web-based app lets users see the entire workflow, from assigning tasks to uploading documents and scheduling due dates. The Premium version allows for file attachments, revision history and even the ability to analyze your work history.

2. ColorNote by Social & Mobile

Platforms: Android, iOS and Windows

Price: Free

This app essentially functions like digital Post-It notes. It allows you to create text notes, checklists, to-do lists, etc., and you can check off items as you complete them. The notes can also be color-coded to keep them organized, and you can even name the color groups. The notes can be added to your calendar and even be shared.

3. Evernote

Platforms: Android and iOS

Price: Free with in-app purchase options

It’s like a notebook for your inner creative, allowing you to capture ideas based on pictures, drawings or writing, create project to-do lists around those ideas and also share them across devices and with others.

4. Duolingo

Platforms: Android, iOS and Windows

Price: Free

If you’re an entrepreneur who wants to take your business global (or at least into another country), learning a new language while trying to do it might seem daunting. But Duolingo aims to help you learn a new language in your down time, like on your commute, while exercising, or even while relaxing.

5. CamScanner by INTSIG

Platforms: Android and iOS

Price: Free with in-app purchase options

This app turns your device into a scanner and also allows you to access, edit and manage documents anytime, even on the go.

6. CM Security by Cheetah Mobile

Platforms: Android

Price: Free with in-app purchase options

This security app offers all kinds of nifty features, like AppLock, which stops intruders who try to unlock protected apps on your device and notifies you with the intruder’s photo.

7. Polaris Office

Platforms: Android and iOS

Price: Free Basic version, $3.99/month Smart version, $5.99/month Pro version

This app lets you create, edit and sync Microsoft Office files from your phone or device, and you won’t lose any of the formatting you worked diligently to create.

Small Business Financing 101

Of course, apps aren’t the only things that can help an entrepreneur successfully build and run their business. Having good credit can help tremendously, as well, since many lenders, including business credit card issuers, are going to pull a version of your traditional credit reports to see if they’re willing to extend financing for your business. (You can see how your credit is doing by viewing two of your credit scores, updated every 14 days, for free on Credit.com.)   

If your credit is just fine, there are plenty of solid business credit cards (see our picks here) available that can help you finance some of your business expenses. The Small Business Administration also offers several loan programs designed to help budding and operational entrepreneurs and there’s also conventional financing at your disposal that you can look into. 

Just remember to manage whatever financing you use responsibly, since many business lenders require a personal guarantee and will report a default to the major consumer credit reporting agencies. You can find tips for making sure a business loan doesn’t wreck your credit here.

Image: Geber86

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